Author Topic: Sugar Bowls  (Read 2445 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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Re: Sugar Bowls
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2008, 08:20:18 AM »
Ivo — Could it be the same mark on the metal as mine?   See reply #1 above.

As for Walsh pressed, it is so good that I have a real struggle at times convincing buyers that it is pressed.   Look for slight wavyness on the cut facets and a lack of the faint striations you get with hand-polished cut.

Walsh pressed is quite scarce.    I've never bought a piece that wasn't described as cut glass.   If you find an example you will be amazed at the quality, only matched by C19 Manchester pickle jars and cruet bottles, equally astonishing.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Anne

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Re: Sugar Bowls
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2008, 03:12:47 PM »
Thanks Bernard, I'm glad it's not just puzzling me.  One of a set would make sense - perhaps one with tongs for sugar lumps for your tea, and the other with a spoon for demerara for your coffee?  Very civilised! :)


Offline Ivo

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Re: Sugar Bowls
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2008, 06:46:36 PM »
The mark is identical to the one you describe - which says nothing about the glass underneath. Mine is really cut -  you'll just have to assume I know my onions.
Ivo
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Offline Bernard C

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Re: Sugar Bowls
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2008, 06:03:09 AM »
Quote from: Ivo
... you'll just have to assume I know my onions.

Ivo — I wasn't doubting your skills at all in relation to glass (or vegetables).    It's just that having seen some of the most experienced (and honest) glass dealers in the world taken in by Walsh pressed imitation cut, I wanted you to re-consider your sugar and re-examine it with an open mind, an exercise which can be quite difficult, particularly for those who have already convinced themselves otherwise.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Ivo

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Re: Sugar Bowls
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2008, 06:34:25 AM »
all cuts, squares, mitres and planes have been hand cut. All edges have been triple beveled, plano and inside/ outside angled.  The neck has not been touched by the wheel and it is not perfectly round, just like you would expect from blown glass. The item is hollow. There is a tenfold symmetry. And so I'll stick to the opinion that it is cut, not pressed.
Ivo
► BLUE HENRY ◄
 New Book: The Almost Forgotten Story of the Blue Glass Sputum Flask

all texts and pictures (c) Ivo Haanstra.


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Sugar Bowls
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2008, 08:43:35 AM »
Ivo — Thanks.

Hopefully our discussion will encourage others to examine their cut glass and find interesting examples of fine quality pressed glass.   See also:-

  • Reynolds p38 for two Walsh patterns illustrated in both cut and pressed versions.
  • Thompson p50 for a Percival Vickers pressed cruet bottle with cut shoulders and stopper.
  • Optic pressed ale glass = (Rummer) Thomas Gammon for an early pressed example of a traditional cut pattern.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Frank

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Re: Sugar Bowls
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2008, 10:56:21 AM »
Frank A.
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