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Author Topic: Murano in WWII  (Read 788 times)

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Offline Carolyn Preston

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Murano in WWII
« on: September 04, 2006, 02:30:19 AM »
As the debate about my piece of glass continues, another question has come up.  

My mother-in-law (the knower of all things, accoding to her) feels that based on the colouration,  it was made in the 20's or 30's.  I thought it might be the 30's or 40's, but then she thought that no glass would have been made during the war.

So plunge in and let me know your theories (or even the facts)


Offline Laura Friedman

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Murano in WWII
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2006, 03:52:13 PM »
According to all the reference books I've seen, almost nothing was produced during the war.  Glass was made and sold in Murano up to and afterwards, but during each war, production all but shut down.  Because of this, pre-war pieces made in the 1930s were sold post war in the mid 1940s and '50s. I believe this to be why, for instance, pre-war pieces were purchased and brought to America in the 1950s.


Offline wrightoutlook

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« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2006, 08:42:49 PM »
Yes, Laura, exactly right. The 1950s decade was the hey-dey for Murano objects, especially vases, being sold in the United States.


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