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Author Topic: Viking Glass  (Read 911 times)

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Offline bidda

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Viking Glass
« on: September 06, 2006, 03:21:13 PM »
Hi everyone,
I picked up a pair of Viking orb ashtrays a while back; one in Spring Blue and the other in Thistle (which was only produced for one year). I already had a Thistle Orb ashtray and lighter set so I compared the two and found that both the new ones have what appears to be an iridescent sheen to them. Does anyone know if/when Viking produced these ashtrays in iridescent/carnival shades? The production date for all Thistle Viking was between '69 and '70 but, I'm wondering if this one might actually be Cherry Glo which I haven't seen in person yet (until now?), only in pictures.

Any info is appreciated. Thanks,
Bidda

Offline butchiedog

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Viking Glass
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2006, 10:43:33 PM »
Bidda,

I am pretty familiar with those Viking ash trays, plus other Viking glass items and do know that running them through a dishwasher over time will produce a light iridescent look to their surfaces, which may be a residue coating or a permanent effect the detergent has on the glass. Keep in mind that the original owners were buying and using these as everyday items, not collecting and pampering them like they are now. --- Mike

Offline bidda

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Viking Glass
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2006, 02:16:46 AM »
Thanks, Mike,
that's honestly something I never thought of. If that's what's happened to them, is there any way to remove that residue and restore them to their original finish?

Bidda

Offline butchiedog

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Viking Glass
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2006, 01:58:13 PM »
Bidda,

I have no credible ideas on how to remove the effect, if possible to do so. I have seen many suggestions about denture cleaners, bathroom cleaners, vinegar etc., but it appears that 9 times out of 10 those methods do not work, but people still enjoy passing those suggestions on anyway.

Myself;  I pretty much leave that sort of thing where I find it, since I prefer to buy nice, good condition glass items, rather than science projects that may not be resolved, leaving me with something I paid good money for on a gamble and end up not wanting in the end. I just play it safe I guess and never allow myself to be too desperate to have something, meaning I collect glass as a leisure time activity only, so the searching and waiting are just as enjoyable as the finding.

Mike

 

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