Author Topic: Attributed as Strathearn. Is it so?  (Read 711 times)

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Offline wrightoutlook

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Attributed as Strathearn. Is it so?
« on: September 30, 2006, 05:31:10 AM »
This would be a new style of Strathearn for me; therefore, would someone who knows about Scottish paperweights confirm that it is indeed Strathearn? The base seems too flat for Strathearn, and the latticino seems more Murano than Scotland. It's hard to get a read on the millefiori canes due to the fuzzy photography. If it is Strathearn (or Vsart), then it adds to my knowledge of that company's input. Thanks.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=330032960445


Offline RAY

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Attributed as Strathearn. Is it so?
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2006, 10:00:47 AM »
looks fine to me
cheers Ray


Offline KevinH

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Attributed as Strathearn. Is it so?
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2006, 06:41:27 PM »
Yes, it's a regular Strathearn design.

At 2.5 inch it would be a P22 (small) version. See Richard More's site at:
http://strathearn.smugmug.com/Strathearn%20Paperweights

The base finish on Strathearn weights varied quite a bit. Lots of them had a smooth, polished base. When seen in real life, or in a good quality photo, the Strathearn P20, P21, P22 range had lace cushions that are quite distinctive in the way the lace appears and is set. It's almost an identifying feature.
KevinH


Offline wrightoutlook

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the more i learn, the more fascinating it all becomes
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2006, 07:52:18 PM »
Thanks Kevin. I've long thought that paperweights from Scotland are the true descendants of the classic French work from the middle 19th-century. As I noted above, I had not seen this specific style before. I've looked at the image in your link. These Strathearn latticino and millefiori are truly rich examples of the paperweight art.


 

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