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Author Topic: marks on glass  (Read 539 times)

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Offline GLASDIERTJE

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marks on glass
« on: October 05, 2006, 08:14:59 AM »
can someone explain me the difference between an engraved mark and an acid mark on glass please?
thank you very much
Janine


Offline Frank

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marks on glass
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2006, 09:28:12 AM »
Engraved mark is cut ito the glass with a point or similar. Acid etched also cuts into the surface and was often applied with a rubber stamp allowing quite complex mark designs. Some may have been etched by transfer. Mostly today, marks are sandblasted, often with an obvious stencil as it is cheaper and safer. For example, almost all Stuart Crystal has a sandblasted mark (since the 1970's ??guess?? ). Sandblasting can often result in a very faint and almost superficial mark.

All of those methods can be used by hand or semi/fully-automated. It is not always possible to tell which method has been used and no-one has published a definitive guide.

Soon to be ousted by ink-jet printed marks which may or may not use an etching compound and will allow for very complex designs that can be fired in.
Frank A.
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Offline archiveIOWSG

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Stencil firing
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2006, 10:00:49 AM »
Hi

Jonathan Harris used stencil firing in the late 80's on his collection of the Reneissance. Not the easiest ways of applying stencils due to obvious problems.

(http://x5.freeshare.us/122fs1222584_th.jpg)

Sand etching (blasting) can be very complex as seen with Timothy Harris's Cameo & Graal collections.

(http://x5.freeshare.us/122fs122269_th.jpg)  (http://x5.freeshare.us/122fs1222760_th.jpg)

Acid etching is a very long process (and very dangerous) each time you expose the material to the acid the resist has to be re-applied aound the etched area so there is no under-cutting.

Will be very interested in the ink-jet theory, it may save a lot of time.

David


Connie

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marks on glass
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2006, 10:18:21 AM »
I think that Fenton might be employing the ink jet method already.  If not then they are using transfer prints that are fired after application.

I can't find an example (because no one shows the bottom of the #$@% vase -Grrrr!) but on Family Signature pieces and Connoisseur pieces there is a complex printed signature.

Maybe Glen can add to this.


Offline Frank

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Re: Stencil firing
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2006, 10:18:23 AM »
Quote from: "archiveIOWSG"
Will be very interested in the ink-jet theory, it may save a lot of time.


Topic was about makers ID markings.

It might be some time before all over ink-jet printing comes but I suppose it is inevitable, current technology is limited to a few lines of text enamel on flat bases and is in use in high speed container production facilities.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


 

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