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Offline Bernard C

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« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2006, 12:02:27 AM »
Quote from: "DenCill"
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... I understand that every Webb item has the acid-etched logo by the ground pontil.

Where did you find that assertion, David?

If you exclude studio glass, limited editions, trial and experimental pieces, trade samples and pressed glass, I cannot think of a single range of British factory glass that would meet this assertion.   Possibly Stuart ring-moulded comes closest, but I have had at least two examples through my hands with no marks at all.

Foreign glass is nearly as difficult.   Flygfors Coquille comes to mind as a possibility, if you widen the search to include engraved marks, but do we fall into the trap of assuming that all unmarked examples must be non-Flygfors look-alikes?

Bernard C.  8)
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Offline David E

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« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2006, 12:13:11 AM »
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Where did you find that assertion, David?

I have noted many things during my research through Pottery Gazette and Glass Trade Review or Pottery and Glass magazines. This was an advert or review where it was positively stated - something along the lines of "every item is marked to assure quality". I know this is vague, but I have had to accumulate a lot of knowledge recently and it did confirm what I had always thought, hence the reason for it sticking. Sure, I suppose there may be some rare examples where a mark doesn't feature, which is why I did say "I understand that every Webb item has the acid-etched logo..."
David
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Offline Frank

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« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2006, 12:24:51 AM »
In my experience, unmarked Webb did not use to be as rare as marked Webb. This could be that twenty years ago much of the signed Webb had not got to market and it was mostly the older stuff out there. It is at least 16 years since I touched a piece of Webb.
Frank A.
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Offline Bernard C

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« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2006, 07:21:04 AM »
David — The 1939 Royal Brierley Crystal retail catalogue states on every page
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See the safeguard of quality marked on every piece . . . the name 'Royal Brierley'.

I expect they all said more or less the same thing in their PR.

In the real world, you get a big order in from a trade buyer who doesn't like their glass marked, then you "forget" to mark it.   You don't want their next order going down the road to one of your competitors.

In the same way, "quality" varied according to the buyer.   Royal Brierley pontil mark finishes were of three types, rough, ground out, and de-luxe feature finishes.   I think it's fairly obvious which type would have gone to Liberty's and which would have gone to Joe Smith's Emporium and General Stores in some small unknown town.

The most important book I ever had through my hands was a late C19 Hobson's Fox-Hunting Atlas.    These were made up to order, and this example had been ordered by an unknown Derbyshire farmer.   The Derbyshire map and those of the adjoining counties were OK, but the rest of the atlas was made up with rejects and out-of-date maps.   The Cornwall map had been overprinted with the Devon hunt boundaries!    Well, it was a map historian's dream find.    That one junk atlas sorted out virtually the complete history of the atlas, much of which was previously unknown.   Hobson's atlases previously owned by Lord this or Earl that told us nothing.

Anyway the point I was making is that PR and reality often don't have much in common, not just in glass but across the whole retail sector.

Bernard C.  8)
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Offline Lustrousstone

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« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2006, 12:41:39 PM »
And doesn't marked sometimes mean a sticker...


 

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