Author Topic: New Murano Looks Like Old  (Read 2039 times)

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Offline alexander

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New Murano Looks Like Old
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2006, 10:02:48 PM »
I've been pondering this question of "investment grade" for a few hours,
I guess it depends on what level you are investing I'd say.

If you are looking for immediate returns only mispriced items should
be bought, and sold shortly thereafter.

If you are looking for long term appreciation of value there are two avenues, that can be combined.

One is to buy pieces from well established artists, preferrably popular in several markets.
With the expectation that the piece will appreciate nicely in value over the period you own it.
This usually means high-end items well above the four digit mark.

The other is to collect pieces from new and emerging artists in the hope that they will become popular,
usually less cash intensive but with a higher risk involved.

Both strategies are long term/deep pocket.
In the business world investment grade usually means something that you
expect will appreciate niecly over the years with a low risk of major loss.  

One thing I have learned is that signature of well known artist = higher price.
Sometimes a very significant higher price. Same with unique vs serial.

For me the most important thing when buying glass is that I like it,
it will look good in my collection and it isn't overpriced.
I try to find pieces that are underpriced or that I think may appreciate some in value,
but I won't let a piece I want go just because it's priced at market value.
I hope my collection will appreciate in value,
but even if it doesn't it has value to me both as objects of art and being useful.

Your piece is beautiful and well worth the price, will it appreciate in value over the years above inflation?
I don't know. Is it signed?
If it is by Luigi Onesto then he's an established artist who commands
fair prices. From what I found he started out in the 60'ies.

An Onesto sale on Ebay
This one is either not unique or has been sold several times on ebay.

Alexander
Alexander
Norwegian glass collector


Offline horochar

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New Murano Looks Like Old
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2006, 12:31:37 AM »
Thanks for your thoughtful response.


Offline wrightoutlook

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a lot
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2006, 09:41:21 PM »
$125 for a glass piece at T.J. Maxx is an astonishingly high figure. I didn't think the place even sold glass at that rate. What were your odds at waiting a week or two and seeing the price get reduced? Were you concerned you would lose the purchase to another buyer?


Offline Sue C

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New Murano Looks Like Old
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2006, 09:54:18 PM »
our localish!! Costco are selling a Murano whale tail, but very expencive


Offline horochar

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New Murano Looks Like Old
« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2006, 11:08:15 PM »
I'm hesitant to give away secrets, but TJ Maxx (or maybe it's just the more expanded "TJ Maxx/Home Goods" locations) on rare occasions get good signed pieces, as opposed to the aisles of low-end Chinese and Polish glass.  Sometimes these signed pieces get reduced more than once, so it might pay to wait, but there's obviously a risk to that.  The best I've bought, at a third or a quarter of retail (they had the red "clearance" label) were a discontinued Salviati Sergio Asti piece and a discontinued Salviati Adam Aronson piece.  I also bought a nice large Kosta Boda vase, at about half retail, just because I like it.  The Onesto was sort of a crap shoot because it actually had no price tag on it, and I didn't bother to research.  The store manager said he thought it was either a $100 or a $400 (Maxx price) piece, but somehow arrived at a price of $125.  I'm hoping that it's actually more like a $400 (meaning $800 retail) piece, but either way I'm glad to own it.  It's quite a bit cheaper than the $4,000 to $5,000 value Leslie Pena places on the Gaspari Salviati piece that it's derived from.  They're both about the same size, around 20 inches tall.

I'm a dedicated Costco shopper for groceries, light bulbs, etc., but I've never bought their art glass.  I too have noticed that they sometimes stock Murano.  They had a really nice signed Salviati piece last holiday season at what I presume was a fair price.  I hope they get more in.

Offline wrightoutlook

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god move
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2006, 12:43:24 PM »
Very smart shopping. Playing the "how much will it be reduced over the next three weeks" game is risky, but sometimes fun. However, the piece you got seems like a winner.

Offline Ohio

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New Murano Looks Like Old
« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2006, 03:04:10 PM »
My local T.J. Maxx stocks & sells Murano l& its not the Chinese stuff either as most of the stuff comes with not only the Murano label, but a certificate. Large pieces are in the $75 range. Next time I drop in there I'll copy the names of the producers (there are two) & post them. I know a couple of dealers who buy Murano from T.J. Maxx & sell on eBay & neither one has ever had a complaint. Ken

 

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