Author Topic: A new JG find...  (Read 1188 times)

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Offline myweights

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A new JG find...
« on: November 09, 2006, 04:49:19 PM »
Hi again,
I have a new find, ANOTHER John Gentile! This time his Flying Goose.
I paid in my minds eye a fairly steep price but on the other hand, KNOW I got what I paid for...
Anyway, I just wanted to chit chat about it if anyone cares to share any info. From what I have read up on John Gentile online and in books he only signed very few special paperweights as a personal favor for some collectors, and ones he deemed collectible. This one has a white frit JG cane, smaller than the green frit JG in the red devils fire one I also have. I seem to remember reading somewhere online that he signed with the frit cane in the 60's and 70's predominantly, but cannot find the source any longer??? It measures approximately: 3 1/4" tall X 3 1/4" wide.
Any thoughts appreciated.

Here are some pics:







Thanks,
Mark E.


Offline wrightoutlook

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more than one goose
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2006, 03:42:44 AM »
The very early John Gentile "flying goose" paperweights are highlighted by a thick and more substanial looking goose. As years progressed and the "flying goose" continued to be made into the 1980s, the goose itself was composed of thinner material. It's difficult to tell from the photographs if you have one of the early ones or something from the later period.


Offline glasstrufflehunter

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A new JG find...
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2006, 08:51:22 AM »
I have a few Gentiles I've collected over the years. Recently I obtained one with a very neat cane arrangement on a bright yellow ground. All of my pieces are newer ones with the oldest being from the early 90s. All have a pontil stamp. I love the millefiori weights. The canes are always so bright and happy looking.
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


Offline myweights

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thanks
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2006, 04:06:55 PM »
This goose is substantial laid out across the pillow of bubbles, and the flowing on the wind effect of the wings is accurately presented. There is also a look of feathers the way it is done along the edges. It has a fairly thick breast, but the rest is fairly thin. A millville christmas/new year weight I have has paper thin frit, this one is not paper thin. If that helps any??? It is not pregnant looking like the one on page 56 in American Glass Paperweights and Their Makers, just well fed maybe. lol Thanks for pointing this out to me, so I guess maybe mine is 70's-80's?
I do notice there is less misplaced bubble mistakes around the work except underneath, possibly indicating the same? Still nicely done, and cane signed collector, so I'm satisfied.
     I am finding myself more and more into American glass paperweights personally. But I really go for the out in left field different than the ordinary glass paperweights of most any maker. With an affection for bugs, reptiles and amphibians. Some of the millefiori ones are nice, but there are just so many chinese knock offs, and yeah I have fell for 1 or 2 like everyone it seems.
Go with what you like, I wouldn't be embarrassed by any paperweights I currently have. The indians and bohemians went to the flea market last week...lol
later for now,
Mark E.


Offline glasstrufflehunter

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A new JG find...
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2006, 05:14:02 PM »
Quote
Go with what you like, I wouldn't be embarrassed by any paperweights I currently have.


I do have some paperweights that I would hide when company came over. :P I keep 'em for memory's sake because I sure did have fun collecting them.

In American makers I have a load of Glass Eye. I stopped collecting them when they decided to get expensive. I have a couple by Gibson. I would love to get a hold of one of their sulphides. recently I started collecting Woods Bicentennial paperweights.

I mainly collect Scottish these days but I still pick up American and Italian weights if I like the looks of them.

I also have a soft spot for Chinese florals, especially if they have insects or animals in them. They're just cute. I have a window sill full of them.

I do have to say my favourite bug weight is a sparkly green one on a daisy by Willie Manson.
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog

Offline wrightoutlook

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the Gentile family
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2006, 07:16:44 AM »
The "Flying Goose" can be considered the trademark paperweight of the Gentile family. The "flying goose" design was actually patented by John Funfrock in 1948. The first "Flying Goose" weight was made by Peter Gentile, the founder of the Gentile paperweight-making family. He was originally from Naples, Italy. He was born there in 1884.

Peter eventually came to America with his glassmaking skills and worked in a couple of cities before starting his own business and building his own factory in 1947 in Star City, West Virginia. The name Gentile is actually pronounced Gen-Tee-Lay. As noted above, in the beginning, the early "goose" figure was more substantial. The "goose" got thinner as time wore on.

Peter's three sons John, Joseph, and Frank, were involved early on with paperweight-making, but when the Gentile Glass works really made a name for itself, in the mid-1960s and onward, it was primarily Peter, son John, and John's wife Gertrude who made the paperweights.

Recognizing that their work deserved to be signed, they ultimately began identifying their output with a series of different stamps on the base. This occurred sometime in or after 1963. They've used a variety of stamps such as a G, a shield, their name, the Liberty Bell, a glassblower, etc. for "signatures."

 

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