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Author Topic: A question for glass-blowers  (Read 1231 times)

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Offline Leni

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A question for glass-blowers
« on: November 09, 2006, 10:00:21 PM »
I have a question that maybe the glass-blowers on the forum will be able to answer - although I won't be surprised if a few of our knowledgeable posters can answer it as well  :roll:  :wink:

How do paperweight makers make the 'frothy' glass such as is shown in this Gino S weight?   :? http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/albums/userpics/10048/normal_Gino_S_weight.jpg
I know how 'controlled bubbles' are put in, having seen it done (by both Adam A and by Alastair Macintosh) but how is this 'foam' technique achieved?  

I ask because I have a couple of the Gino S flower weights and am intrigued to know how they are made!    Also, I have just bought a new one which is a large ball of 'froth' with Christmas Trees in - well, 'tis (approaching) the season!     :wink:  :lol:
Leni

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Offline tropdevin

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A question for glass-blowers
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2006, 11:11:42 PM »
I think you get lots of small bubbles by sprinkling charcoal dust onto the glass before taking another gather and reheating in the glory hole.  That is certainly one way it can be done: I tried this under instruction at Selkirk Glass earlier this year.   Alan.
Alan
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The comments in this posting reflect the opinion of the author, Alan Thornton, and not that of the owners, administrators or moderators of this board. Comments are copyright Alan Thornton.
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Offline Leni

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A question for glass-blowers
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2006, 08:18:00 AM »
Thank you very much for that information, Alan  :D
Leni

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Offline KevinH

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A question for glass-blowers
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2006, 11:46:22 PM »
http://www.fossilfly.com/history_of_Murano_glass_page3.htm

The link is to a page for "History of Murano Glass" which contains a Glossary. For the term "Pulegoso", which is what Murano folk called the mass of bubbles [used in art glass and also paperweights], it is stated that Kerosene was used - sprinkled on the hot glass.

I imagine this was much like using charcoal or even fine chalk, but giving the "frothy" effect. What I do not understand, is how anything sprinkled on the got glass could be controlled to produce both small and larger bubbles in the "froth" - which is something I have noticed in all weights with the pulegoso effect.
KevinH

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