Author Topic: Sowerby Glass Boat  (Read 4953 times)

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Offline flagstaff

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Sowerby Glass Boat
« on: January 29, 2005, 09:13:58 PM »
What can anyone tell me about this Glass Boat Rd42947 Sowerby 10 Feb 1886 ?  
http://tinypic.com/1houj9

Thanks
Ian


Offline Cathy B

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Sowerby Glass Boat
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2005, 07:59:53 AM »
This is taken directly from (Australian) Collectables Trader February/March 2001, written by prolific Australian collector Gary Workman.

"Sowerby registered pattern number 42947 on the 10th February 1886 and it has been known for many years as the Daisy Block or Blocked Daisy pattern. [...]

"Daisy Block Row Boats were produced along with a whole suite of glassware in the Daisy Block pattern. The first row boats were produced in 1886 in flint (clear) glass in four sizes - 4 1/2", 10", 12" and 15" long. Only one size of stand (which is extremely difficult to find in any colour) was produced and used only for the three larger size row boats. The small 4 1/2" row boat is a salt container and does not require a stand. Together with the flint (clear) colour the row boats were also produced in opal, blanc-de-lait, Sowerby's malachite colours, blue aqua and Sowerby's vitro porcelain colour range [ed: i.e. white]. All of the colours mentioned were made from 1886 until about 1910.

"When Sowerby introduced their carnival glass range in the late 1920s, the row boat was the only mould to have survived from the Daisy Block pattern suite of glassware.

"The colours found in carnival glass are marigold, purple and a hard to find aqua. The keel sections were ground flat to ensure a good level contact and they were simply flower holders to decorate a table. The row boats are sometimes found with a Sowerby peacock trademark and the 92947 registration number. To my [ed: i.e. Gary's] knowledge only the carnival glass examples have a ribbed interior pattern."


You have done well to find one with a stand! (Unless they are more common in the UK than Australia - maybe someone else can comment). Hope that helps a little.

Cathy.


Offline Glen

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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2005, 09:09:23 AM »
I think the text in that last sentence above may have suffered in transposition from the original. It looks (as per the caption text) as if there are several sizes of Daisy Block Rowboat in Carnival. There is, in fact, just one size known in Carnival Glass - the 12".

It also looks (as per the caption) as if there is an opal Carnival example and a briston (?) blue Carnival one, and a clear Carnival one. I'm sure it's just a transposition error, but I thought it was best that I mentioned it.

(Please note that Cathy has kindly edited the comments referred to above).

Gary's comment earlier in the article ("The colours found in carnival glass are marigold, purple and a hard to find aqua") was right on. I would add that the amethyst/purple is also hard to find. I have never seen a Carnival Glass stand, but people have told me they have seen them. No-one has yet produced a photo of one (or better yet, the actual item). Does anyone have a stand in Carnival? If so - a pic please :shock:

Finally, in answer to Cathy's question: "You have done well to find one with a stand! (Unless they are more common in the UK than Australia - maybe someone else can comment)."  Well I have never found a stand that I could afford! They are not easy to find (IMHO) - but then, the boat isn't exactly common either. From my experience, the marigold Carnival Daisy Block rowboats are scarce and the amethyst and aqua are downright rare.

I've got opinions on the availability of the other colors, but I haven't studied them (with a view to airing my opinion in public) so I'll wait and see if anyone else would like to add their two pennorth.

Glen
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Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
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Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Frank

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Sowerby Glass Boat
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2005, 11:52:31 AM »
Going by the glass boats on eBay it would seem that these were in vogue with several English glassmakers of that period. Was their some historic event that led to the rowboat motif? First Channel crossing in a rowboat etc?
Frank A.
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Offline Glen

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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2005, 12:34:49 PM »
Yep, lots of boats in the late 1800s  :D  They were probably issued (circa mid to late 1880s) to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Grace Darling's amazing North Sea rescue that took place in 1838. There are lots of websites where you can read about Grace Darling - here's a couple of them (the first is the Grace Darling Museum)
http://www.holy-island.info/gracedarling/
http://freespace.virgin.net/john.elkin/darling.htm

She had courageously rowed out through stormy seas with her father, in a lifeboat, to save people from a wrecked ship. The incident took place off the Northumbrian coast, in the area where the NE glassworks (Sowerby, Davidson etc) were located.

We have a pink Daisy and Button boat - Edward Bolton RD - that has the words GRACE DARLING moulded into it. It's an interesting item as it bears two moulded RDs and the Grace Darling wording is also on twice. One RD is 23527 (has to be circa March 1885), the other is 39414 (Dec 11, 1885).

I'm sure one of our contributors knows more about this than I do, and will chip in.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Cathy B

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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2005, 11:43:48 PM »
Glen:  Whoops!!!!  :D Will go back and delete the caption related text. In the eyes, out the fingers - years of mindless typing pool experience showing....

I've read that Hobbs (West Virginia?) did a daisy and button yacht series, and that these were reproduced a few times over the last 150 years, and that few of the repros are marked. I'm sure someone knows more that that (sketchy, fourth or fifth hand information :).

Cathy B.


Offline flagstaff

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Sowerby Glass Boat
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2005, 11:06:12 PM »
many thanks for the very interesting and useful replies concerning the Sowerby glass boat -oops Daisy Pattern Rowboat. It now has pride of place in our china cabinet with a suitable placard of its history.
Thankyou from Ian


Offline mhgcgolfclub

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Re: Sowerby Glass Boat
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2012, 09:13:18 PM »
Added for reference the stand is registered RD52434 July 13th 1886

Roy


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Sowerby Glass Boat
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2012, 09:36:36 PM »
now why don't I have a stand?..................I must have half a dozen boats in varying sizes, but none ever came with a stand :(


Offline Frank

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Re: Sowerby Glass Boat
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2012, 09:38:45 PM »
Stands all got sold to collectors of 'Desk Ware' as Calligraphy pen holders  ;D
Frank A.
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