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Author Topic: Conservation grade marking pens  (Read 800 times)

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Sklounion

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Conservation grade marking pens
« on: December 21, 2006, 07:04:02 PM »
Please could anyone recommend a brand of conservation-grade marking pens for glass?
TIA,
Regards,
Marcus


Offline Sue C

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Re: Conservation grade marking pens
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2006, 08:18:36 AM »
Good morning Marcus, do you want visable or uv?


Sklounion

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Re: Conservation grade marking pens
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2006, 10:11:45 AM »
Hi,
Thanks Dexter,
I'm looking for visible, but which will not cause long-term damage to the glass. I am interested in the pens that would normally be used by museums.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline vidrioguapo

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Re: Conservation grade marking pens
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2006, 12:03:06 PM »
Not sure if this will help, but there are China marking pencils available from most art shops which don't do any damage to China so possibly would do for glass. They are black and softish and easily removeable.  Emmi


Sklounion

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Re: Conservation grade marking pens
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2006, 12:06:53 PM »
Hi Emmi,
Thanks very much for this.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline Frank

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Re: Conservation grade marking pens
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2006, 12:36:58 PM »
I was wondering what this would bring up. I have not heard of any ink formulations that are certain not to affect glass, though ink is often sold in glass bottles it tells you nothing.

I have seen glass marked with a technical pen using India Ink, but I would not be too sure that Indian ink will not etch the glass. Indian ink dries quickly but stays slightly raised from the service and is prone to chipping. I presume the above suggestion was for Chinagraph pencils, which are wax crayons in a stick. But would smear at a touch. Probably the best option is either the CD marking pens, special formulation of ink that does NOT etch plastic, or enamel paint applied with an ultrafine lettering brush, allows you to also use colour coding.

Perhaps... you know a friendly chemist who could apply some theory.
Frank A.
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Offline Max

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Re: Conservation grade marking pens
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2006, 01:06:14 PM »
Just had a look over the net, and have found the MDA - 'Museum Documentation Association', who are based in the UK.  There's a lot of information there about labelling for museums, but I couldn't find anything on glass particularly.  However, there is an associated Forum with that website.  I've registered, but haven't had my account activated yet, so can't say how well it's run.  Might be worth a try?

 http://www.mda.org.uk/index.htm

http://www.mda.org.uk/labels.htm



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