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Author Topic: Kristian Klepsch  (Read 1363 times)

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Offline a40ty

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Kristian Klepsch
« on: January 15, 2007, 07:29:55 PM »
Good evening.
I hope no-one minds my asking yet another question. Does anyone have information about Kristian Klepsch  ( the father as opposed to the son) and especially about the production technique of this piece, in English? I have some info in German but cannot understand very much of it. Do know that the mould was useless after each piece and that this one is titled "Ash Wednesday". I have Googled/Clustied and Monstered like mad but without success :(


Please excuse the disorder of the pictures, I will try to arrange them better soon.
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4581
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4582
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4583
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4584 http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4585

Any help would be greatly appreciated! with best wishes, a40ty



Offline Frank

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2007, 08:37:19 PM »
It will have been made using something like a lost-wax process, basically the model is made from wax and a mould made using sand or plaster of paris. Once set is is heated and the wax melts leaving the impression behind and material to be cast then poured into the mould. In some cases it is possible to pour the material into the wax filled mould and have the wax vapourise from the heat of the casting material. Commonly used to create bronze-sculptures it is not commonly used for glass, must be tricky. In this case the process must have been two stages as the glass is occupying the space of the mould material in a one-step process.
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Offline a40ty

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2007, 07:02:13 AM »
You're right, Frank. It is lost-wax process, and I think they used plaster of paris because there was a very faint white residue which I managed to remove.
But I wonder how they did it, step by step. There are so many intricate details, both internally ( the standing girl in particular ) and externally ( the troll or devil figure ). If the mould had to be recreated every time, it explains the fact that production was stopped because of high costs.


Offline Frank

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2007, 09:00:40 AM »
For multiples, you need an original model that would be reuseable until worn or damaged - depends what material it is made from as to how many 'impressions' can be gotten. Is the piece numbered?
Frank A.
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Offline a40ty

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2007, 11:22:16 AM »
No, they weren't ever numbered but were part of a series where each sculpture was limited to either 150 or 300 pieces. Can't remember which.


Offline a40ty

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2007, 07:57:27 PM »
Just checked and the sculptures were either limited to 150 or 300, depending on the design. This one was 300.


Offline pamela

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2007, 09:48:45 PM »
I do know quite a lot about lost form from my goldsmithing and I follow Frank in every respect  :)
If your piece is a contemporary one, may I presume the internal pattern is done by Laser please? Which would also confirm the computer aided edition of up to 300 ?
just a guess  :-[
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Offline aa

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2007, 11:32:54 PM »
Frank is fairly close with his description.

I had the chance to examine a similar piece at Coburg in 1985, where his work had been selected for the Second Coburg Glass Prize. I think, but I'm not sure that he may have won one of the prizes, but his work was certainly exciting a lot of interest. I also think I ended up buying a pyramid, which didn't take long to sell. It was a long time ago and it is gradually coming back. I think he had three pieces on show. The Veste Coburg museum had first pick and took the best one, and so I must have had the second best!

It was fairly well accepted at the time, mainly from what he indicated to others (not myself) that he combined engraving techniques with lost wax casting, but what is so special about his casting is that it has the added dimension of being "inside out". This involves not only highly complex mould making but as you pointed out, the mould is broken for each one. But that begs the question - how about the figures on the inside. Well, my recollection was that the plaster models were on the inside, and taking rather a lot of care, he had to remove the plaster from the inside as well. I believe this was done with a flexible drive and diamond engraver, (rather like a dentist's drill), but I'm not a hundred percent sure, as I haven't seen him at work.

Technically these are amazing pieces and extremely difficult to execute. There are loads of things that can go wrong in making work like this! :) Of course, if you manage to get the piece out of the mould without any cracks, you then have to grind and polish all the sides of the pyramid.

I always wondered whether any of the editions were completed. I would be surprised if they were.
When searching, it is worth googling Christian Klepsch as well, since some sites have incorrect spelling.

Hope this helps.

I don't know enough about the laser technique, but from the little I do know I think it is unlikely to have been used in these pieces.
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Offline Frank

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2007, 12:48:58 AM »
Yes, I thought it would need to be POP confirmed in that you found some residue. Today there must be other casting techniques that could achieve some even less believable results. Possibly that would even allow completely encased hollow motifs built using 3d printers and materials that could be vapourised after the glass has cooled.

Adam can you remember the sort of money involved?
Frank A.
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Offline Cathy B

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Re: Kristian Klepsch
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2007, 01:16:09 AM »
Oh, it reminds me of a most extraordinary piece that used to be on display at the National Gallery of Australia - Karen Lamonte, Dress 4

http://www.nga.gov.au/Home/Frameset.cfm?View=../Menus/search.cfm
http://www.karenlamonte.com/images_dresses_largescale.htm

It used to stand in an alcove in front of a window looking over the cafe, and I miss it - it is so much more impressive (and infinitely more subtle) in the 'flesh'. I wonder how she does it.

 

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