Author Topic: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design  (Read 1017 times)

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Offline josordoni

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Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« on: January 18, 2007, 03:10:13 PM »
This is a lovely Glass Eye dichroic paperweight - I have gone through all the pics I can find of their dichroic weights, and can't find this one, it is dated 1985 so obviously quite an early one.

Does anyone recognise it?

thanks!

http://www.clarkagency.co.uk/clicpicjan/_local_glasseye.htm


Offline glasstrufflehunter

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Re: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2007, 09:29:04 PM »
I have some egg shaped GES weights with that spatter up the sides. That's an irridized paperweight not dichroic. Dichro is rare elements vaporized in a vacuum and deposited on glass. Irridizing is done by applying a solution containing gold or silver usually to the surface, but sometimes I've seen it encased afterwards like in pieces by Eickholt.

Dichroic glass appears to change color when viewed from different angles. Irridized can look rainbowy but the colors do not move or change.

Glass Eye did make some dichroic pieces but this was after they started acid etching their signatures rather than scratch signing. I saw the first ones around 1995.

I have a lot of Glass Eye. It was the first studio I collected seriously until they started pricing as high as Scottish weights. At that point I felt like I got more bang for my buck with Perthshire.
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Offline Frank

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Re: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2007, 03:32:50 AM »
Dichroic glass is, properly, glass that changes colour based on transmitted or refelected light. It goes back to Romam times. It is unfortunate that in our modern age some glass suppliers have chosen to abuse the terminology and that this has been continued by their customers.

True dichroic glass is exquisite, the abominatons in its name are mostly just cute!
Frank A.
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Offline glasstrufflehunter

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Re: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2007, 04:27:58 AM »
A few months ago I saw an exhibit of Roman glass at the Getty Villa. Talk about exquisite!
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

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Offline josordoni

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Re: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2007, 08:42:00 AM »
I have some egg shaped GES weights with that spatter up the sides. That's an irridized paperweight not dichroic. Dichro is rare elements vaporized in a vacuum and deposited on glass. Irridizing is done by applying a solution containing gold or silver usually to the surface, but sometimes I've seen it encased afterwards like in pieces by Eickholt.

Dichroic glass appears to change color when viewed from different angles. Irridized can look rainbowy but the colors do not move or change.

Glass Eye did make some dichroic pieces but this was after they started acid etching their signatures rather than scratch signing. I saw the first ones around 1995.

I have a lot of Glass Eye. It was the first studio I collected seriously until they started pricing as high as Scottish weights. At that point I felt like I got more bang for my buck with Perthshire.

Ah, the colours did seem to change as I moved it, so I assumed (wrongly it would seem) that it was dichroic.... thanks for putting me right. If they didn't make Dichroic until 1995, then this isn't it...

Is dichroic always as bright and vivid as the jewellry I have seen?



Offline glasstrufflehunter

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Re: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2007, 05:19:33 PM »
Yes it is much brighter and more vivid than the irridized stuff. The change of colour is also really obvious. To me it looks like coloured foil.

I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


Offline josordoni

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Re: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2007, 05:59:56 PM »
Yes it is much brighter and more vivid than the irridized stuff. The change of colour is also really obvious. To me it looks like coloured foil.



Ah, well it is certainly not that!

In fact,  I don't think I like dichroic.... ;D



Offline Frank

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Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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Offline Frank

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Offline glasstrufflehunter

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Re: Glass Eye USA - anyone recognise this design
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2007, 07:17:44 PM »
That's very interesting about the Alexandrite glass. It no doubt got its name from the gemstone which changes from green to red depending on the light.

In general I like dichroic glass. I have a few pieces by GES and a couple by artist Janet Wolery.

I like sparkly.  ;D
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog

 

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