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Author Topic: Weekend difficult Q  (Read 1354 times)

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Offline karelm

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Weekend difficult Q
« on: January 19, 2007, 10:03:37 PM »
Ok..I have been trying for two weeks to figure this one out...
It is a double overlay weight in white overlayed with a beige/khaki/light brown colour. Bottom of weight has a millefiori "bubble". Each window has the typical rim (white) of overlayed work.
The trick is that it has only four (4) windows plus one on the top, having searced far and wide I cannot find a 4 +1 weight to compare with.  I love this weigth but want more info or at least a good idea before buying it.
Anyone want to volunteer an idea?
Sorry no picture!
Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"

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Offline KevinH

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Re: Weekend difficult Q
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2007, 12:52:34 AM »
Murano faceting is often 4+1.

I'm not sure what you mean by a millefiori "bubble", though.
KevinH

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Offline karelm

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Re: Weekend difficult Q
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2007, 05:54:04 AM »
Sorry KevH the "bubble" isone of my technical terms  ;D. If you look through the top facet the millefiori in the bottom looks like the mushroom type you would find but only the cap of the mushroom.  Or to put it differently, the faceted weigts that I have seen the millefiori tends to look flat but this one it looks more rounde, almost like in a traditional weight.
Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"

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Offline Wuff

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Re: Weekend difficult Q
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2007, 12:16:00 PM »
Whilst this weight has 5 side facets - is that what you describe as "millefiori bubble"?

(http://www.seelentags.de/pw/kugel61a200.jpg) (http://www.seelentags.de/pw/kugel61d200.jpg) (http://www.seelentags.de/pw/kugel61g200.jpg)

Click on images for larger view. The last image is the view through the base - ground but not polished, and therefore a bit blurred.
I believe this weight to be Murano - but am not sure.
Best regards  -  Wolf
Wolf Seelentag, St.Gallen
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Offline karelm

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Re: Weekend difficult Q
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2007, 03:25:18 PM »
Lovely...yip that is what I call a "bubble" ;D
So is there a real term?
Thanks
KarelM
PS: Wolf I believe I still owe you an email (regarding ebay) ....but I have been busy and I am still trying to catch up on my German
KarelM
Wien
Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"

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Offline wrightoutlook

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Re: Weekend difficult Q
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2007, 03:35:36 PM »
Of course this is Murano, and a nice one at that. Any value is relative to what you're willing to pay. But the fair warning price on this one is $75 tops.

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Offline Wuff

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Re: Weekend difficult Q
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2007, 09:48:34 PM »
Quote
Lovely ... yip that is what I call a "bubble"
So is there a real term?
Don't know what to call this myself - just recognised your description ;). The more expensive ones are "mushrooms" - what do you call just the upper part of a mushroom?

Quote
Wolf I believe I still owe you an email (regarding ebay) .... but I have been busy and I am still trying to catch up on my German.
No hurry - and English is fine with me as well.
Wolf Seelentag, St.Gallen
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Offline wrightoutlook

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Re: Weekend difficult Q
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2007, 12:56:32 AM »
The top of a mushroom is called the cap. The thing holding up the mushroom cap is called the stem.

This paperweight is a nice millefiori paperweight with side and top facets, but it's nothing over which to get excited. It's a standard Murano millefiori overlay, circa 1970s/1980s.


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