Author Topic: Kilner Jars History  (Read 6593 times)

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Theresag

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Kilner Jars History
« on: April 13, 2004, 03:31:46 PM »

Can anyone tell me a little of the history of the Kilner jar please?  Any data greatfully received.

thank you
Theresa Green


Offline Angela B

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Kilner Jars
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2004, 10:13:42 AM »
Kilner Jars were made by a Yorkshire firm of glass bottlemakers called Kilner, who operated from 1842 when John Kilner founded the first company until 1937 when they went bankrupt. At the bankruptcy sale in 1937 the patent rights to the "Kilner Jar" were bought by United Glass Bottle company and also the rights to the very similar "Mason" jar that had been made by Kilner.  They went on making the Kilner and Mason jars.

The various names of the Kilner companies were:
John Kilner & Co, Castleford, Yorkshire, 1842-44
John Kilner & Sons, Wakefield, Yorkshire, 1847-57
Kilner Brothers Glass Co., Thornhill Lees, Yorkshire, 1857-73 also at Conisbrough, Yorkshire, 1863-1873
Kilner Brothers Ltd., Thornhill Lees, Yorksire 1873-1920 also at Conisbrough, Yorkshire, 1873-1937.

Hope this is helpful, Angela
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Offline Mazarin75

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Re: Kilner Jars History
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2011, 01:51:12 AM »
Hi,

I live in Montréal, Canada, and a few years ago, I was walking near a place where a decontamination was conducted, and I found a bottle that seemed antique. I cleaned it out, and I keep it carefully.

And yesterday, I decided to do a little search about it. On the bottom of the bottle, here what is it written:
J K & S
    M
20    0
  1961

Size:
height: 20.7 cm
bottom: 7.4 cm
shoulders: 8.0 cm
neck: 4.8 cm

Doing some searches on the Internet and, thanks to you, I found out JK&S means "John Kilner & Sons" and the bottle is probably more than 150 years old!

Continuing my searches, I tried to find out the original purpose of that bottle (syrup? medecine? fruit salt? pickles? chutney?), but I didn't find out. And what about the value? Is it rare or not, etc.

Do you have some answers for me?

Thanks in advance!
François


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Kilner Jars History
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2011, 06:46:55 AM »
François — Welcome to the GMB and congratulations on such an excellent first posting.

I think that your bottle could be either a milk bottle or a sauce / ketchup bottle.   The "1961" might be a date or a pattern number.   The "20" could be its capacity in fluid ounces — 20 British or avoirdupois fluid ounces = 1 British pint = 568ml — please would you check.   US fluid ounces are about 4% larger than avoirdupois fluid ounces, and only 16 to the US pint.

Is there a history of early morning doorstep deliveries of milk in Canada as in Britain?   If so and if it's a pint, then it's likely to be a milk bottle, then sealed with a disposable cardboard or waxed cardboard disc usually printed with details of the dairy.   I can only remember foil closures, and that's from the mid to late 1950s, but I'm sure cardboard closures continued in use in some areas over here for years.

That's all, particularly as I must collect our two pints of milk from the doorstep and put them in the fridge!   Thanks for the reminder.  ;D

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Carolyn Preston

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Re: Kilner Jars History
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2011, 05:22:13 PM »
Having lived in Canada all my life, I can assure you that we had door to door delivery of milk well into my teens, I think, which would have been the '70's. You can still purchase milk in glass bottles, but they come from swish organic dairies. The closure system was a thin piece of cardboard and then a thin metal top as well.

Carolyn

Offline Mazarin75

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Re: Kilner Jars History
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2011, 09:17:20 PM »
Hi again,

First, thanks you Bernard for your reply. It is very instructive! As Angela says, JK&S stands for "John Kilner & Sons", which was in operation only between 1847 and 1857, so no I know that 1961 is just a pattern number!

About the "20", I've a done a little test with water in it, and you are also right! It represents 20 fluid ounce (UK), which is 19.22 fluid ounce (US) or 568 mL.

About the milkman, yes! We had it. Actually, the service was still provided during the 80's in Sorel-Tracy, the little town I come from.
http://www.laiteriesduquebec.com/laiteries/chalifoux.htm

François

Offline Mazarin75

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Re: Kilner Jars History
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2011, 09:21:53 PM »
Wow... I just realize the richness of that website! There is historic information about a lot of dairy producers in Québec... and their bottles!! Have a look!
http://www.laiteriesduquebec.com/frames3an.htm

Offline Bernard C

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Re: Kilner Jars History
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2011, 06:24:32 AM »
...   As Angela says, JK&S stands for "John Kilner & Sons", which was in operation only between 1847 and 1857, so no[w] I know that 1961 is just a pattern number!   ...

François — It's not that simple.   You have to distinguish between formal company names, like those Angela listed, trading names, brand names and logos.   A good name or abbreviation in any of these categories is a valuable corporate asset.   Occasionally the main reason for buying a company is just such a name or logo.   It is quite possible that "JK&S" was so well known and easily recognised within both the bottle making and drinks industries that it was never changed, whatever the formal name of the bottlemaker or its controlling corporation over the years.   So I think the "1961" is still quite likely to be a date.

I love the Quebec Dairies website.   Many of the links it provides are also well worth exploring.   Here's the home page:


Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot

 

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