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Author Topic: Carnival bowls - windmill patterns = Imperial Glass  (Read 4142 times)

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Offline Anne

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Carnival bowls - windmill patterns = Imperial Glass
« on: February 05, 2007, 02:02:59 AM »
Some time ago I bought a bowl with two windmills on it, which I posted here and Glen kindly confirmed it for me as Imperial Double Dutch.  Glen explained there was another windmill pattern with one windmill, also by Imperial, and I've been searching for that one for a while.  On Saturday I found one. Well, actually I found two, but they are different - even though each only has one windmill.  I checked on David Doty's site and found the larger of my two listed there as Imperial Windmill, but no sign of the smaller one.

Searching the board brought up an earlier question by Adam P where he posted a pic of the same pattern as my smaller bowl, which there Glen does ID as Windmill, asking why Adam didn't think it was. I'd come to the same conclusion as Adam had, as there are several differences between the two patterns showing the single windmill - enough for me to wonder if it was made by someone else or was a different pattern name.

So, a question for Glen really, are both these variations bought on Saturday definitely Imperial Windmill, please?   8)

Both single windmill bowls side-by-side:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4877
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4882

Large single windmill bowl:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4881
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4880

Smaller single windmill bowl:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4879
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-4878

And just for good measure to keep them all together for reference, the double windmill bowl, Imperial Double Dutch:
http://yobunny.org.uk/gallery1/displayimage.php?pos=-981
http://yobunny.org.uk/gallery1/displayimage.php?pos=-980

(PS Glen I'm not sure I should tell you how much they were...  ;))



Offline Glen

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Re: Carnival bowls - windmill patterns
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2007, 08:13:04 AM »
It's Imperial's "Windmill" Anne - they both are.  :)

I'll quote you what I wrote about the pattern in "Carnival Glass The Magic & The Mystery".

WINDMILL. Imperial.
The initial approach is realism - the finished effect, however, with the addition of a daisy border, gives the pattern a distinctive style. It’s a landscape, undoubtedly European in origin, with the windmill dominating the scene. A feeling of nostalgia pervades. WINDMILL often confuses as it comes in several different landscape variations according to the size and shape of the item it is found on. The elements in the scene vary, however:
•   There’s always a windmill (though the shape of the roof varies and the sails are in different positions).
•   There are always trees (they vary - sometimes all deciduous, but on one bowl, there’s a conifer).
•   There may, or may not be, a church.
•   There’s always a bridge, but it varies as to whether it’s in the background or the foreground.
•   The fabric of the bridge varies - it may be stone or wood.
   
The main pattern element that determines WINDMILL is the single windmill. All variations of bowl, dish and tray have a stylized daisy pattern above and below the landscape. On the jugs and tumblers the landscape motif is within framed medallion shapes, each separated by stylized daisies.

Shapes: various sizes of bowl, oval dishes and flat trays, water sets and two further sizes of jug. The WINDMILL pattern varies according to the shape it is found on. (Its original pattern number in earlier catalogs was #514).

Colors: marigold, helios, purple, clambroth, smoke, aqua, and emerald. Tumblers are also known in lavender, olive and blue (water pitchers also in blue). Large and medium sized bowls are also known in marigold on milk glass.
   
DOUBLE DUTCH. Imperial.
Similar in concept to WINDMILL, this pattern differs in the extra elements that appear in the landscape. There are two windmills and a boat as well as trees, a bridge and so on. The stylized floral border is there again, but only around the sides and at the bottom. The exterior pattern is FLORAL AND OPTIC. Note that there are three, distinctive, squared off feet on this piece. DOUBLE DUTCH had the same original factory number as WINDMILL (#514) and was undoubtedly intended to be in the same pattern range. In fact, DOUBLE DUTCH, WINDMILL and HOMESTEAD all made their appearance together in 1915, suggesting that they are all variations on a theme.

Shape: 8 to 9 inch footed bowl, ruffled or round (ice cream shaped).
Colors: marigold, purple and smoke. Also reported are helios, emerald and amber

I hope this explains it properly - if not, please let me know.
Glen


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Also, Riihimki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
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Copyright G&S Thistlewood

Offline Anne

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Re: Carnival bowls - windmill patterns
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2007, 04:35:14 PM »
Glen, thank you,  thank you,  thank you, that explains it beautifully and clearly for me. I am learning about Carnival from you (albeit slowly ... but then I'm not a Carnival collector... repeat to convince myself - I'm not a Carnival collector!  ;)) and fell for these two pieces as soon as I saw them, but they are destined to go to my Mother for her Carnival collection. As always, she will be thrilled to know who they are by and why they are different but the same.  I much appreciate your help as ever.   :)

 

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