Author Topic: Crack or Flaw in basket - ID = Davidson  (Read 2825 times)

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Offline Ambergreen

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Crack or Flaw in basket - ID = Davidson
« on: February 15, 2007, 06:28:05 AM »
I would appreciate someone's expert opinion on this glass basket (possibly Fenton).  The arms of the basket appear like twigs and there seems to be two cracks across one of the arms.  However, the cracks don't show right through the glass so I was wondering if they may be a flaw from when the piece was made?

http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-5155
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-5156

Would appreciate your thoughts on this.
Cheers,
Lyn


Offline David E

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2007, 11:46:39 AM »
Could be a manufacturing flaw, like a 'straw mark' or when the glass cooled, but it might depend on how strict Fenton were on quality control.
David
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Offline Glen

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2007, 12:48:07 PM »
Fenton are very strict on Quality Control today, and have been for many decades.

It looks like the cracks have taken place when the handle has been bent round (I think that is not unusual). The outer / upper edge has been stretched over a greater surface area and thus has opened up these little cracks. I have some similar little crevices on the handle of an old Dugan basket.

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Connie

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2007, 12:52:59 PM »
From what I can see of the basket, it doesn't look like Fenton to me.

Could you show a picture of the whole basket.

I agree with what Glen said and for some reason these small cracks appear more frequently on milk glass.  I think milk glass tends to have less viscosity? edited to add elasticity (is the word I meant) when hot, I know it is very brittle when cool.


Offline Cathy B

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2007, 01:26:10 PM »
One way of telling the difference between a manufacturing flaw (either one of those little manufacturing cracks Glen describes, or a straw mark) is to look for evidence that it had happened while the glass was hot. This might include where the edges of the crack itself were deformed at all,  crack was opened forming a valley. If the edges of the split are rounded (feel with a fingernail), then it's a straw mark. (Is that correct, everyone?)

Speaking of flaws, I have two pieces with what seem to at first sight to be cracks, which when viewed under magnification  actually seem to be streaks of elongated bubbles and frit. Is this possible, or is it wishful thinking?  ;)


Offline Glen

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2007, 01:37:48 PM »
A straw mark is a unique characteristic - I don't believe that it is likely to ever be found on a handle (unless it was a most unusual mould and plunger) - and it isn't a split in the glass.

A straw mark is probably best referred to as a Shear Mark. It is caused by the cold surface of a pair of shears coming into contact with the hot glass gob (the gob is cut by the shears and dropped into the mould).
http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/ShearMark.html

I would not call a shear mark a manufacturing flaw - it is just a feature of pressed glass. On a busy pattern, a clever glassworker could drop the gob into a part of the mould that was patterned, thus "hiding" the mark. Fenton actually developed their shears over the years, and added a smooth knob at the end of the handle - the idea was that the gob would be cut, dropped in the mould and then gently rubbed with the knob in the place where the shear mark was.
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Offline Cathy B

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2007, 01:41:55 PM »
Thanks for the clarification, Glen!


Offline Frank

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2007, 02:42:42 PM »
Was not that long ago, I saw an eBay description along the lines of: "Straw marks on base are caused by shipping from the factory in straw filled containers."  ;D must have been from that Australian glass book Cathy that mentioned as having some equally bizarre glass definitions.
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Offline Cathy B

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2007, 02:48:30 PM »
LOL Frank, I swear that's in there somewhere...


Offline Glen

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Re: Crack or Flaw
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2007, 03:57:41 PM »
Yeah, the straw marks come from being packed in barrels full of straw is an old chestnut. In fact it's absolutely true that the glass was packed in barrels full of straw - but that's not how the marks were made, of course. However, you can see how it gave rise to the name "straw mark".
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