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Glass Identification - Post here for all ID requests => Glass Paperweights => Topic started by: AdrianW on April 29, 2018, 10:49:43 PM

Title: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: AdrianW on April 29, 2018, 10:49:43 PM
I was wondering whether anyone could identify this paperweight for me please? As you can see it's a low dome concentric millefiori design, with a polished base.

I think it's Old English, perhaps Richardson?

A couple more pics in the next post, including a shot under UV.
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: AdrianW on April 29, 2018, 10:50:57 PM
Here are the last two pictures, including one under UV. As you can see the cross design canes all fluoresce quite strongly.
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: AdrianW on June 12, 2018, 11:19:41 PM
Anyone? Please?
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: Nick77 on June 13, 2018, 09:28:58 AM
Not Richardsons but Arculus/Walsh Walsh.

Nick
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: tropdevin on June 13, 2018, 08:27:24 PM
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Agreed.  Low dome = Arculus. Also the rather messy finish.

Alan
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: AdrianW on June 13, 2018, 10:19:23 PM
Thank you both!

Completely agree that the finishing quality does point to Arculus.

The reason I was wondering about Richardson was the way the canes were sort of gathered in underneath at the base?

As a matter of interest, do either of you collect Old English? If so, I was wondering whether you had tried yours under UV light? I was just wandering what how common Uranium canes were, and whether they were diagnostic of a particular maker?
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: tropdevin on June 14, 2018, 06:43:09 AM
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Hi.  Yes, I collect Old English (my wife is an Arculus).  The canes in many OE makers pieces are sometimes drawn under - it is not a pointer to the maker.   I have tried some under UV, and various makers sometimes have canes with uranium content that fluoresce, unfortunately...it would be nice if it could help with ID, but I fear it does not help. Specific gravity can help rule out some makers, but cannot confirm who made pieces.  I think there may be some possibilities of improving ID using the portable x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy machines, but they are very expensive (25,000 plus to purchase...).

Alan
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: AdrianW on June 14, 2018, 09:06:43 PM
I'm glad I'm not the only one thinking along those lines :D

I was thinking of a gamma-ray spectrometer myself, but I think your choice might be better! Sadly I have access to neither myself.

One of the things I'm really curious about is the age of the paperweights. I suspect that there are fakes wandering around, and it would be good to confirm which ones are actually modern.

As you know, even when there isn't intent to deceive paperweight makers love to try their hands at making previous "superstar" weights... I think everyone has made a "Baccarat"-style Pansy at some point; it certainly seems like it ;) I have both a Perthshire and a J-Glass example.
Title: Re: Low dome Old English concentric millefiori, Richardson? Uranium canes
Post by: tropdevin on June 15, 2018, 08:09:11 AM
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Hi

Regarding the age of Old English, the Arculus and Walsh Walsh paperweights were made from the early 20th century through to 1939 (this includes the ones with the fake 1848 dates).  Richardson were making them around 1900 - 1914, and maybe much earlier.  Bacchus and Islington made a small number in the late 1840s - early 1850s.  But there are several other manufacturers whose names and dates of production are not as yet known.  Regarding fakes, I don't think anyone has faked an Old English paperweight for the sake of it: but there are the 1848 fake date ones, and there are plenty of mis-attributions by sellers, whether on eBay, at Fairs, or through antique shops.

ALan