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Recent Posts

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71
Glass / Re: Frosted decanter.
« Last post by flying free on September 20, 2022, 07:27:11 PM »
Ekimp see also From Neuwelt to the Whole World, Jan Mergl - page 140 plate 168 - goblet, engraved in Harrachov, probably the workshop of Franz Zacher.  A partially matte-treated crystal glass.  Dates to 1804-1845.

Certainly seen matt treated glass from the 1820s in Das Bohmische glas.

m
72
Glass / Re: Harrach? Frosted Blue Vase.
« Last post by flying free on September 20, 2022, 07:14:11 PM »
Das Bohmische Glas Band III shows some of those opalines dating to 1860s.  So whilst some of those in that linked photograph might have been shown at the Worlds Fair Vienna in 1873 I think some date to 1860s.  I'd have said yours was in the 1860s.

m
73
Glass / Re: Harrach? Frosted Blue Vase.
« Last post by flying free on September 20, 2022, 06:43:44 PM »
I think it's much earlier than 1900.  Probably c.1860s   Although there are some photos online from a visitor to a museum that refer to opalines being shown at the 1873 Worlds Fair Vienna 1873.  In those photographs there is what appears to be a pink opaline version of yours in one of the cabinets.  That said, I've not looked through the books and so there is no primary source for that date info apart from the comment on these photographs and there were 3 or 4 pics of groups, so I don't know if all of them pertain to this referred to 1873 date.  I would think earlier than 1900 certainly though.

You should be able to see the pink version of yours here:  Top shelf right hand side of photograph
https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-glass-museum-passau-bavaria-germay-111582230.html?imageid=3AC4C6F3-FB5F-4A8B-91E5-16066C95EF54&p=329548&pn=1&searchId=47130edf1076f22abbf2902f044c25ff&searchtype=0

Maker could be Harrach or Josephinenhutte or other makers.  Perhaps Schachtenbach? however I don't know when they ceased operating.  That might have been before the Worlds Fair?  I'm very hazy on Schachtenbach dates and what happened to the factory/name.

m
74
Thanks for the great links Ekimp.

To be honest the first one I've seen in cut glass dates to c.1830s and is a pineapple shape  - referred to as such in the caption if I recall correctly.  The second oldest one I've seen is most ornate and is in the Farbenglas book.  That's a water melon shape or marrow shaped horizontal box with lots of ribs carefully handcut  into it, the ribs are gilded as well as the stalk and it's sat on a leaf shaped underplate with cut rim and also all gilded with gilded veins and edging to the intricately serrated rim. It's in transparent dark green glass so pretty true to marrow shaped form or watermelon perhaps and lots of manhours gone into the making and decorating.
I think they were used with stalks either with ribs or without throughout the 1800s, but in the Harrach book it discusses how they gradually used ribs on them to denote a peeled fruit/vegetable type thing if I've remembered correctly.  I think they were used in all forms but perhaps became less ornate as the century wore on simply because less manhours required for a simpler shape?  Then of course the snake handled boxes came into fashion in the 1860s.

The ones you've pointed out in the unknown maker catalogue appear to be eisglas.  That book looks maybe 1870s to me looking at the other pieces in there. I don't know why they've mentioned 1865/1905. Perhaps it does date to 1865? Some of the white enamelling on coloured glass looks like Julius Mulhaus to me.  Interesting that of the two stalk boxes which look like eisglas one has a round plate and the other is a ribbed box and so has a ribbed underplate to match (more expensive option than the plain one maybe?)

Food for thought! thank you for the links.

m

Here is a picture of the piece that dates to the 1830s I mentioned above  :)
It's I think denoted as a pineapple in the book:

http://czechfoodiesmn.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-glass-at-glasmuseum-passau.html
75
British & Irish Glass / Roayl Brierley 'Starlight' for show.
« Last post by keith on September 20, 2022, 05:27:24 PM »
First one I've ever seen apart from in the catalogue, just over 5 inches tall and marked to the base, probably early 90s at a guess  ;D ;D
76
British & Irish Glass / Primrose Pearline cream jug.
« Last post by MHT on September 20, 2022, 04:26:28 PM »
Primrose pearline cream jug. no Reg. Number, about 3.5" high.
I've looked in my books, the GlassGallery, online and I cannot find one like it.
I assumed Davidson but perhaps it's Greener?
Anyone any ideas?

Thanks
Mike
77
Glass / Re: Siddy Langley?
« Last post by chopin-liszt on September 20, 2022, 03:42:00 PM »
Well done.  :-* It is good to be absolutely positive.  8)
78
Glass / Re: Water jug - Teachers Whisky promotional - who and how did they do that?
« Last post by chopin-liszt on September 20, 2022, 03:38:04 PM »
The lettering does appear to have the use of some mould involved. I'm wondering if white frit was "stuck" to the protrusions of the lettering on a kind of plunger?
I did do copper enamlleing work for a bit many years ago. Patterns could be painted on something using an oil, which frit was sprinkled over. The frit stuck to the oil and any that was remaining outside of the desired areas could be "painted off" using the same oil.
The oil just burnt away on firing.
The red frit could have been applied to the plunger in the same way.
Unless, of course, there are glassmaker's tricks I don't know anything about.  ;D  ???
79
Glass / Re: Siddy Langley?
« Last post by suzygpr on September 20, 2022, 02:08:56 PM »
After several attempts with magnifying glass, strong reading glasses and twizzling about in direct sunlight I finally found a 2.  This led me to the rest of the signature bit by bit - and it is 100% Siddy Langley - I'm chuffed to bits!  I'm pretty good at finding signatures, so I was determined that if there was one that it would not elude me.  I did email Siddy direct, and she was almost certain it was one of hers too.  Thankfully the very well camouflaged signature has confirmed things  :)
80
Glass / Re: Ercole Barovier? Murano Iridescent clipped rim bowl 1940s??
« Last post by NevB on September 20, 2022, 01:37:53 PM »
Looking for something else I've seen similarly ribbed bowls attributed to Alfredo Barbini.
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