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Recent Posts

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Quick note to say ... I have added a comment to Reply 188 about the vermicular pattern mentioned in that post.
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Webb's 'Gay' glass.
« Last post by nigelbenson on Today at 12:06:07 AM »
Many thanks for the reply Paul.

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Glass Paperweights / Re: english millefiori paperweights 1862
« Last post by flying free on Yesterday at 11:54:12 PM »
oh me too :)

I now wonder what they really meant?
And yes, having now read so many reports contemporary to that period, they are all SO woolly on who did what.
I suspect it may partly be to do with company secrets and hiding stuff from competitors.
And I think it is what leads to the effusive praise of 'we do this so well now, faaaar better than our competitors' and that stuff.

But I also suspect that in fact it might be that some of it came from the competitors (Bohemia especially)  in the first place!

m
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Glass Paperweights / Re: english millefiori paperweights 1862
« Last post by KevinH on Yesterday at 11:46:53 PM »
Yes, "twist cane" is a simple terminology for "threads of colour, or plain white, or a mix of the two which are twisted during the pulling". Trying to use the correct Italian terms is something I usually get wrong. Filgrana / Filigree (in the English meaning!) / Retorti / Reticello ... etc. ... too confusing for me.  ;D
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Glass Paperweights / Re: english millefiori paperweights 1862
« Last post by flying free on Yesterday at 11:31:56 PM »
I 'think' milk fioro was a typo in the script, but maybe, just maybe, they were describing clear glass weights with lattimo filigrana canes in?  Are those what you have called 'twist canes' Kev?

So it could in fact be a typo and a misunderstanding of what 'millefiori' was?

m
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Glass Paperweights / Re: english millefiori paperweights 1862
« Last post by KevinH on Yesterday at 11:19:19 PM »
It's a pity the Jurors did not state the name of the company or companies showing the millefiori "globes" or "ornamental paper weights". And it sounds as if they were describing what in modern terms could be called "twist canes" rather than slices of millefiori canes.
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Glass / MOVED: Stuart Villiers Oleta ID please
« Last post by KevinH on Yesterday at 10:51:54 PM »
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Glass Paperweights / Re: Your thoughts on what will appreciate in value?
« Last post by tropdevin on Yesterday at 10:43:54 PM »
***

I think values and 'appreciation' are difficult to deal with.  Like any form of art, scarcity and 'desirability' within the market will affect price, and in the longer term, older pieces - such as current 'antiques' - will be more likely to increase in price than pieces from current makers who keep making more and more examples.  At the moment, many of the higher end pieces are selling for maybe half what they would have fetched 5 to 10 years ago...and some of the less valuable pieces are unsaleable.  But this is a passing phase, and it is a good time to buy wisely. However, there are no quick profits at present ...you need to be prepared to wait.  My view is that the genuine antiques from the mid 19th century can only increase in value in the long term - they are limited in numbers.  Expensive modern artists who are still producing pieces are a much more risky prospect.

Alan
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Webb's 'Gay' glass.
« Last post by Paul S. on Yesterday at 10:00:01 PM »
it's late Nigel so I will spend time on this tomorrow a.m. hopefully  -  for the time being, and without investigating the three references I quoted in that first post, I am assuming it came from one of them - let's hope that is confirmed tomorrow. :)

back again Nigel  -  the name V.R. occurs in C.H. '20th Century Glass', but it's not linked to an illustration in that book, and it does look as though I've made a wrong assumption in associating it with the design you refer to, which I believe is correctly 'horizontal wave'.           V.R. is a legitimate design, and is apparently an alternative name for 'heavy pillar mould'  -  a pattern shown in C.H. 'British Glass 1800 - 1914' - and very dissimilar to horizontal wave.

thanks for pointing out my error - much appreciated - and perhaps the Mods. can correct my mistake when convenient. :) [Mod: Initial post corrected]
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Webb's 'Gay' glass.
« Last post by nigelbenson on Yesterday at 09:46:50 PM »
Hi,

Can I ask where the name 'Venetian Ripple' for the original item featured in the is thread comes from please? It's just that I thought this pattern was called something different and Venetian Ripple referred to another.

Many thanks, Nigel
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