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Recent Posts

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1
In his 'British Glass 1800 - 1914' page pp. 278 - 279, under Patents and Techniques, Charles Hajdamach shows a picture (b. & w. unfortunately) of a clear bowl (it could be optically moulded but I can't be sure), on which are vertical rows (eleven I think), of turquoise beads, similar to the appearance to the salts posted here.          The bowl is small  -  2.25 inches tall, and dates to early C20, he says, and am sure the beads are smaller than those on the salts.
C.H. devotes half a page in giving details of the technique patented by H. Wilkinson in 1905, and in fact quotes verbatim from Wilkinson how this technique, which starts out as threading and ends up appearing as beads of turquoise attached to the outside of the bowl, are spaced at regular intervals.
Too long winded to quote here, but struck me as having sufficient design similarity to the appearance of the pieces here, that it would be of interest.

It's probable that Wilkinson's fairly complex process of manufacture which started life as a threading round the bowl and is then spun, has no relevance to the simplistic manufacture of the salts, where - probably - the beads are applied manually, end of story.          But perhaps Wilkinson thought the artistic appearance of this design was of sufficient appeal to make it worthwhile to patent an idea that started life c. third of a century earlier??
2
ok, potentially an interesting new piece of information here as well:

The Spectator reported the court case from 1851
in their issue 6 December 1851:
http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/6th-december-1851/2/alttrofolto

'At the Criminal Court, on Friday, Thomas Robert Mellish and James Douglas were convicted of defrauding the Patent Glass-silvering Company, of which they were servants, by conspiring to make false entries in the books. Sentence of transportation against each ; Mellish ten years, Douglas seven.'

What's interesting about this report is that they used the company name of  the 'Patent Glass-silvering Company'.





Just a further note because I'm not sure I understand these court cases.  Is it possible that 1851 case was the big/main case against both Mellish and Douglas and on which they were both sent down, but then subsequent to that there were further cases brought against them for specific money embezzling incidents?

m
3
Glass / vintage glass pitcher again - with photos
« Last post by Rosemary on Today at 09:43:32 PM »

sorry.
finally figured out how to post more than one photo.

Searched all my glass books and cannot find this pattern.
6 panels around the pitcher - 3 of what appears to be shafts of wheat?
and 3 groups of 3 star bursts.
                                          height: 9.5" at tallest curve on either side of the spout.
clear circle base, no marks on base: 4.5" diameter
                             inside diameter: approximately 4"
Half heart-shaped handle with series of depressed circles with 3 inset bars between on each side of handle.
3 mold marks, one going through the handle
shape suggests 1900-1920

If I do this correctly, there should be 4 photos:
1. view of 'wheat'
2. view of star-bursts
3. one side view without contrast
4 close-up of handle

Any help in identifying this pitcher would be greatly appreciated.
Rosemary
4
Glass / vintage glass pitcher
« Last post by Rosemary on Today at 09:38:54 PM »
Searched all my glass books and cannot find this pattern.
6 panels around the pitcher - 3 of what appears to be shafts of wheat?
and 3 groups of 3 star bursts.
                                          height: 9.5" at tallest curve on either side of the spout.
clear circle base, no marks on base: 4.5" diameter
                             inside diameter: approximately 4"
Half heart-shaped handle with series of depressed circles with 3 inset bars between on each side of handle.
3 mold marks, one going through the handle
shape suggests 1900-1920

If I do this correctly, there should be 4 photos:
1. view of 'wheat'
2. view of star-bursts
3. one side view without contrast
4 close-up of handle

Any help in identifying this pitcher would be greatly appreciated.
Rosemary
5
Glass / Re: Any ideas ? Strange crackle glass bowl
« Last post by Paul S. on Today at 09:30:23 PM »
that last comment is rubbish  -  the water, if it was used, would have been in the funnel and not in this central opening of the bowl.     Crackle or ice glass was of course big in last quarter of C19, so not impossible this could be that old, although difficult to be certain without some form of proof which doubtless we'll never find.         Please may we also have some comment regarding wear if any, and would remind people that it is customary that some sort of dimensions are provided  -  otherwise we don't know if this is 3 inches or 3 feet tall.    thanks :)
6
Glass / Re: kuttrolf history and variations
« Last post by Paul S. on Today at 09:14:11 PM »
thanks for your reply  -  perhaps we'll never know the real reason for the distinctive design, but you may well be correct about an accident.

quote  ...................  "nothing from VII to XVII"  -  it's all the fault of the Dark Ages with Saxons/Vikings and medieval philistines - barbarians. ;)

Look forward to seeing some more of your kuttrolf bottles.
7
Glass / Re: kuttrolf history and variations
« Last post by parfaitelumiere on Today at 07:39:55 PM »
for now, I saw the first examples as mediteranean, 3d AD (one referd as 3 BC but probably a mistake)
Shame, I saw one like this, sold on christies auction for about 1500, not so much.
After that, VI-VII AD some european versions, somehow similar but more open top, I am waiting for some translated from german, I will share here.
After that, nothing from VII to XVII
After that, a late XVII norvegian example, and many XVIII- early XIX similar to what we can find on all german-danish-norvegian area, 2 part blown glass, top is a separate piece, some with hot glass add-on, some dutch with engravings too.
Also found a early XIX american version, unique, and quite original model.
After that, late XIX, english silver collared versions (one piece blown english made glass?), danish holmegaard, german colored glass
After that, XX, dutch enameled, and holmegaard modern stuff.

About the original design, I also was thinking about accident, many roman glass have square design with hot pinched round shape, and maybe someone piched a bit too much, and made the first kuttrolf.

Yes glug glug is the first name I discovered, wanting to buy a victorian decanter, and discovering the specific shape.

I have many pictures but am waiting to understand better, and make some better pictures removing backgrounds and makin classification.
8
Thanks Christine, my copies have arrived.
9
Glass / Re: kuttrolf history and variations
« Last post by Paul S. on Today at 06:55:00 PM »
Hi - wish you luck in your endeavours in collecting these things, although not so sure that members of the GMB will have C4 Roman examples :)
Must be the most long lived general shape of bottle for decanting booze, and no doubt still made - originating in just about every country that made glass  -  I always think of them as being mostly from Scandinavia from mid C19 to mid C20, but I'm really only guessing.
I'd hazard a guess that earlier examples don't come cheaply, but at least you'd never run short of something to collect.

In English they are referred to sometimes as 'glug-glug' bottles, no doubt from the sound produced by the exiting liquid  -  in Danish they might be Klukflaske.
If you search the Board's archives using such names am sure you will find lots of examples posting by members over a period of some years.

There may be books specifically for such bottles, but the only one I'm aware of - and it's expensive, unfortunately, is Andy McConnell's 'The Decanter - An Illustrated History of Glass from 1650'  -  although he does include illustrations and information on earlier pieces.     As you can imagine, the text is in English.
Do search the archives here though, you will find some interesting posts.  :)

P.S.   Are you able to tell us why this particular multiple throated bottle was invented in the first place  -  perhaps just an accident of design, that gained appeal?  I don't know the answer.
10
Three pdfs of the three court cases are available on request.
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