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Glass Identification - Post here for all ID requests => Glass Paperweights => Topic started by: Frank on August 24, 2005, 09:36:44 PM

Title: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on August 24, 2005, 09:36:44 PM
Kevin,

Frank Eisner joined James A. Jobling & Co in 1930, he was their first Continental glassblower. By 1958 Eric was working alongside him as a glass-blower.

From "Mixed Batch" 1958 - Joblings in house magazine.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on August 24, 2005, 10:23:38 PM
Thanks Frank.

A few more finds like that and we may be able to start making some sense of things.  Now, I wonder if Joblings was his first UK position ... ??
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on April 13, 2006, 10:09:29 AM
Some input on Eisner's from Adam Dodds:

Quote from: "Adam Dodds"
I knew Eric well for a very short time and I knew OF Frank, but during the period in between those you mention. (1930-1958)

In Summer 1948 I did eight weeks as a student (part of the course)at Lemington Glass Works and my home base was the chemistry lab.  Eric Eisner was the junior of the two chemists working there.  I suppose he was about the same age as me, 20, and we got on well.  I never met him after that but I heard later that he was manager of one of the Scottish companies.  I don't see how he could have been a blower unless he diversified when with his father.

Eighteen months after Lemington I had started work at Sowerbys, working with Andy Wemyss.  Although Andy started and ended his career at Sowerbys, at some stage (probably during WW II) he worked at Lemington and knew most of the people I had met.  He mentioned
Frank Eisner more than once.  I can't remember the context but I'm sure they would have met at Lemington. Andy had no first hand contacts at Joblings.

I can't remember much else but if you have any specific questions they might trigger some life in the old memory!


Followed up by:

Quote from: "Adam Dodds"
In describing Eric E. as a chemist, I may have been guilty of doing what I hated people to do about me!

In fact only the senior man (Ernie Walton, later at Sowerbys or Davidsons, after me) was the full-time analytical chemist.  Although Eric was based in the lab, and may have trained there, I think his duties were better described as glass technologist in that he was out and about in the factory and probably (not sure) reported to Bill Robson.  Bill had been he chemist before Ernie but by then was more or less a glass technologist.  Digressing, when I arrived at Joblings thirteen years later, Bill was already there and, in fact, was under me for a while before departing to Davidsons or Sowerby (whichever one Ernie wasn't at!).  We seem to have been an incestuous lot!


From Ian Turner:
Quote from: "Ian Turner"

I think I may have misled you about when Frank was working at Moncrieff's.  He was definitely there working alongside Paul because Eric told me - and others have confirmed - that Frank and Paul used to eat their lunch together and were sort of friends (if anyone could be described as a friend of Paul - he was not the most 'friendly' person at the works because he thought he was so much better than any of the others - which of course he was).  I have no evidence that Frank was there when all the Ysarts worked in the Monart shop, so I'd better withdraw that and stick to what I was told; i.e. that he was working there in the 50s and that Eric worked there until much later before he lost his job and became a furniture seller.  That I can confirm: I went to look at his shop!


Chipping away at it - I still have a few more trails to follow-up.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on April 17, 2006, 08:16:49 PM
Dave Moir added some more info:

Quote from: "Dave Moir"
Yes I do remember Frank. Jack Allan and I used to meet him for a beer on Saturday dinnertime.Eric would bring him and come back for him He was crippled with Arthrietis by that time but he was happy . He asked me to make a Crystal Ball for him and he told me how to make it.

I think he also worked at Leamington and Waterford The Weight he gave me was made at Waterford Unfortunately it has split in two did I not let you see it at Ysart meet?

I also know that he developed the glass Tubing for Radar sets at the onset of WWII. I beleive he was awarded the George Medal for this work. He had some work in Moncrieffs but I am not sure what he did

His son Eric was Chemist and Manager at Moncrieffs in the 60s and 70s the could have been there earlier I do not know Eric died about a month ago.


I also got a bit more from official sources but did not get the actual documents:

First some background for other readers:

There is an issue with paperweights that are reputedly made by Frank Eisner. Bohemian style flowers in a vase. It has been assumed that these were made at Moncrieff in the 30's but as I have proven he could not have been there prior to 1949 or later than 1964. After 1964, he did come into Moncrieffs at the weekend and would play around making weights - but the only metal available to him was MS1 (Moncrieff's borosilicate) which did not work with coloured glass and most cracked in annealing.

The area of the glassworks used by the Ysart's was STRICTLY off limits to anyone and the only known exception being his apprentice after WWII - Chic Young.

War record exists and suggests Frank was at least 14 by 1914 and thus retiring circa 1964/5.

"Description Medal card of Eisner, Frank
Corps Regiment No Rank
Middlesex Regiment G/98196 Private
Date 1914-1920 Catalogue reference WO 372/6 Dept Records created or inherited by the War Office, Armed Forces, Judge Advocate General, and related bodies Series War Office: Service Medal and Award Rolls Index, First World War Piece Denham W - Everitt H Image contains 1 medal card of many for this collection"

He gained citizenship to the UK in 1919:
"Nationality and Naturalisation: Eisner, Frank, from Czechoslovakia. Resident in Birmingham. Certificate 4,740 issued 23 September 1919."

Which would imply he worked elsewhere before Leamington. From c 1930

Another official record may (or may not) be Frank: Initials F H J Eisner born 21-4-1894 and he would then have retired in 1959.


Getting closer :?:
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on April 19, 2006, 03:39:21 PM
Thanks for the additional info, Frank.

I have also had some extra snippets very recently from another source and this begins to tie together quite well.

I would appreciate the following comments and images being viewed solely as part of this message and not copied or used elsewhere. (Although the evidence is beginning to make sense, much of the detail still needs to be sorted out and anything taken out of context could be misleading. Also, I might change my mind on some of my current assumptions or conclusions!)

It is most likely that the "Leamington" referred to in Dave Moir's details was actually the "Lemington" (without the "a") that Adam D mentioned. This is a place [not marked on general UK road maps] adjacent to Newcastle Upon Tyne, where there was a very old glassworks which eventually was owned by Sowerby. Frank Eisner being at Lemington is backed up by a marked and dated item - sorry, but details not yet available for general sharing.

Dave M's commenyt about Frank Eisner also being at Waterford ties in with something else. I had already known for some time of a paperweight with very good etched details suggesting Frank Eisner worked for Waterford (but location may not have been the actual Irish place?) in the late 40s or early 50s.

Rgarding the type of "Eisner flower" weight we are talking about, these are not (usually?) "Bohemian style flowers in a vase". They are like those shown in my Ysart Glass conference images - some of which are shown below.

Two examples (profile only): http://i3.tinypic.com/vxozsy.jpg
These two show a typical form of the ground and of the flowers. The ground can also appear in other colours or even in clear glass. Most often the ground is decorated with scattered coloured bits.

The weight on the left of the above image was a "must have" since it has one whole cane (albeit misshapen) and some part canes which match to Ysart work! The weight also has a blue-purple tint to the dome, similar to that seen in some "1930s" Paul Ysart weights and various weights from early Vasart days. The Ysart cane is shown here:
http://i3.tinypic.com/vxp1g7.jpg

I bought two "Eisner" flower weights from the same source, one of which was a typical example. The other was rather different:
http://i3.tinypic.com/vxp1rm.jpg
Three of the flowers are of the same general form, bu the the fourth has many more petals. There are leaves, which is not a regular feature and the ground is a mottled green-and-white which is also not typical.

All examples I have viewed under UV have shown the same reactions - the same as early Ysart weights. But this does not prove they were made from the same glass as the Ysarts used. All it means is that the UV reaction suggests a soda-lime composition. Very similar results can be seen for various items from various countries. I have not therefore placed much reliance on the UV reactions of these "Eisner" weights to suggest attribution, except to say that they have all been similar to one another. It's the other evidence that is needed to confirm or deny things.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on April 20, 2006, 06:38:22 AM
Colin Mayor placed Frank & Eric Eisner as having been in Newcastle. This is also my supported by the Jobling documentary evidence.

Another reference I have is that a former Waterford glassblower at Moncrieff had made swan friggers - I will see if I can get a name to that, c1950 would tie in with the information but it is still an assumption, I will also try and get info from Waterford.

It may be worthwhile getting hold of more details on the George Medal award but that would probably need to be done in a UK library so over to you Kevin ;-)
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Anne on April 20, 2006, 12:31:43 PM
Quote from: Frank
Dave Moir added some more info:

Quote from: Dave Moir
I also know that he developed the glass Tubing for Radar sets at the onset of WWII. I beleive he was awarded the George Medal for this work.

Frank, this doesn't add up...  the George Medal dates from 24 September 1940 and was awarded mainly for civilian acts of gallantry.

From the Medal warrant signed by George VI...
Quote
The medal is intended primarily for civilians and award in Our military services is to be confined to actions for which purely military honours are not normally granted. ...   It is ordained that the Medal shall be awarded only for acts of great bravery.

The development of radar tubing was doubtless vital war work, but does not fall within the criteria given in the warrant, so if Eisner received a medal of some kind I would not think it to be a George Medal.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on April 20, 2006, 06:52:30 PM
Anne's doubt is valid.

The George Medal was the next level down from the George Cross but, like that award, was given for "Heroism" & "Great Gallantry". However. during the early period following its creation as an award, there were some alterations to the criteria for receipt. I was hoping that: "(c) acts connected with civil defence" would cover what we are looking for.

But then ...

The full list of recipients of the George Medal from 1940 to 1983 is given in the book Dragons Can be Defeated by Major D V Henderson. I thoroughly browsed that book today and there is, sadly, no record of any Eisner as a recipient, as a "Uk national", a "Foreign national" or an "Honorary recipient".

I plan to check another book, simply called Radar, which is probably available at a library not too far from me. I am hoping that this one may provide some technical or development points that could link in to the research.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: mjr on April 29, 2006, 12:21:23 PM
Was this  ebay  (http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7410354869&rd=1&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&rd=1)item (just ended) an Eisner? .  Looking at the examples above and those in Bob Halls Scottish book it looked like it was - or ois it just Bohemian?   Is it all down to flourescence?
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on April 29, 2006, 12:46:57 PM
It has all the features of the majority of the ones attributed to Frank Eisner. A pity that a straight profile view was not shown (but I was happy with it from the two basic photos, so did not enquire further).

There seem to be quite a few of these weights around.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on April 29, 2006, 01:54:56 PM
When you get to Radar book, the link should be to Jobling, Wear Glassworks, Sunderland as that was where he was in War years.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on July 04, 2006, 03:46:30 PM
A bit late with this, but I checked the book Radar some while ago and it had fascinating details and personal reminiscences about the development of radar equipment and its usage. But there was nothing that helped in connection with Eisner or any possible work that he may have been involved with.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on August 16, 2006, 08:29:38 PM
One more chip with thanks to Stan of Scotland...
Quote

I have in my collection of medals a British Empire Medal(BEM) awarded to Frank Eisner and he is gazetted in London Gazette as follows;

Frank Eisner, BEM LG 09 Jan 1946 Page 323 - listed as Glassblower. Lemington Glass Company.

At some point in the future I am hoping to have a look through the newspaper archives that may contain information of his award and hopefully a picture.I hope this is of some use to you.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on December 29, 2006, 12:52:20 PM
A Spitfire paperweight recently sold on eBay. It was signed by Frank and dated 1944 at Lemington. Totally different from the spitfire weight shown in the book Ysart Glass.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Sklounion on December 29, 2006, 04:01:37 PM
Frank,
I think it was yourself who sent me a link to the book on Robert Havel and Waterford.
I believe he is still alive, and as both he and Charles Bačik and indeed Eisner were all of Czech origin, it would make some sense if Eisner went to work there.
Worth an explore?
Regards,
Marcus
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on December 29, 2006, 04:07:27 PM
He was at Waterford in the 1950's. But exact dates are not known yet. Hoping that family records will be saving some time... have made a connection.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 10, 2008, 11:34:08 AM
Consolidating with current information
Eric Eisnerc1930 – 2006Chemist. Initially at Lemington Glass works starting as a laboratory assistent in 1943. Joined Moncrieff in 1953. Moncrieff’s factory Manager in 1962. Various posts up to Managing Director until taken over by British Optical in 1984. Then worked as a furniture dealer.
Frank Eisner BEMc1895-1905 – ?Father of Eric Eisner. British Empire Medal for glass tubing for radar in WWII while at Lemington Glass Company. Rumoured to have made weights at Moncrieff in the 1930s. But was working at Lemington c1930 to 1950, then Waterford, if at Moncrieffs in the 1950s is not known. Retired in the 1960s he did lay out weights on Saturdays with other glassworkers at Moncrieffs, most of these cracked as made from Monax or MS1 glass which was not suited to use with coloured glass.

I hope to confirm the missing dates with the family in the near future. If Frank Eisner weights were made with Soda-Lime then they are very unlikely to have been made at Moncrieff.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: RAY on September 07, 2011, 05:00:42 PM


Dave M's commenyt about Frank Eisner also being at Waterford ties in with something else. I had already known for some time of a paperweight with very good etched details suggesting Frank Eisner worked for Waterford (but location may not have been the actual Irish place?) in the late 40s or early 50s.



kev ... is this the engraving your on about?

click image

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/yorkshirebob/samson/th_Picture140.jpg) (http://s21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/yorkshirebob/samson/?action=view&current=Picture140.jpg)
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 07, 2011, 07:40:47 PM
Fascinating Ray, I wonder who/what MC was! Does not tie in with names I recall at Waterford then - have to dig out the Havel book. At least the date ties in with research to date. Good to see things getting more detail, can you do a side and top view too please.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: RAY on September 07, 2011, 08:09:35 PM
it just measures just over 3" across and 2.5" high, the glass has a yellow tinge to it, not grey as the photo suggests, the engraving to me looks like it's been done with a copper wheel,

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/yorkshirebob/samson/th_Picture151.jpg) (http://s21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/yorkshirebob/samson/?action=view&current=Picture151.jpg)
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/yorkshirebob/samson/th_Picture143.jpg) (http://s21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/yorkshirebob/samson/?action=view&current=Picture143.jpg)

Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 07, 2011, 09:05:08 PM
What this weight does tell us is that it was probably one of the very first Waterford products following the installation of their furnace and that the initials M & C may be the founders christian names Miroslav and Charles. So the inscription had special significance. The installation of their furnace would also be why they hired Eisner as apart from Miroslav, in 1950 they had 3 German cutters and the rest were trainees, including Domhnall Õ Broin who had joined them at that time.

So quite a significant piece of glass history! You should try and contact Brian Havel who wrote the book on Miroslav Havel and may be able to shed some more light on this remarkable find a museum piece for sure.

(Makes up for today's disappointment I guess  ;) )

It also tells us that Eisner made these weights at Waterford and probably prior to that at Lemington as this was no practice piece. So it may solve the other puzzle and finally trash the Moncrieff source story.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 08, 2011, 11:19:16 AM
This weight has been implicated in the badge weight study http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,21601.msg239605.html#msg239605

Study examples reposted link http://www.scotlandsglass.co.uk/cms/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=336&Itemid=6
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on September 08, 2011, 02:14:55 PM
The engraving that Ray has shown above is similar, but not identical to, that on base of the weight pictured in Bob Hall's Scottish Paperweights book, page 53, photo bottom right. The detail on the one in Bob's book is "WATERFORD" to the top, "WR" over floral design to the centre and "19 FE 50" below - and the F & E are linked in the same way as on Ray's example. [Not sure where my personal photos of that weight are right now!]

The weight itself is also similar to the one shown in Bob's book, which has three multi-coloured flowers over a coloured chip ground. I am sure that the weight Ray shows is now the second known "signed" example made by Frank Eisner at Waterford.

By the way, I am currently trying to finisih off some long outstanding tasks including latest research into the Eisner story.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 08, 2011, 03:34:32 PM
Good to hear Kevin, still cannot find my Havel book which might make sense of initials... but they could also have been engraved as wedding gifts or similar in which case it is very odd that Frank put his signature on... have to see how many coincidences if the book names the engravers and apprentices in 1950. The thought that these commemorate the furnace start-up is of course attractive!

Ray, any chance you can get some provenance for your weight?
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 08, 2011, 04:09:37 PM
Re-reading the thread, it struck me that there is a possibility that Paul and Frank were both active in the Society of Glass Technology and may have gotten acquainted at meetings of the society which Paul certainly attended. Should be trivial (famous last words) to find out if Eisner was active in the SGT.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: RAY on September 09, 2011, 03:55:41 PM
Frank the weight was bought in a sale in Dundee
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 11, 2011, 08:09:50 PM
Auctioneers are usually not the most helpful but if you can give me the details by email I will try and get them to help get some provenance.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on October 17, 2011, 09:07:57 PM
Another chink, Pottery Gazette 1950 annual

W H Swingewood & Co Ltd., Albert Works Stourbridge.
Lead Crystal
General Manager F J Eisner B.E.M.
(company not in 1946, new manager 1952)

So his move to Waterford came at the time the second factory was being built to produce Lead Crystal. So Frank had the chance to make weights in an informal environment at Ballytruckle, The Johnstown factory was close to the Waterford harbour and gasworks and Eisner was one of those recruited to help set that up. As it opened in October 1951 it was clear this weight was not made there.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on October 19, 2011, 11:17:09 PM
Frank, that's interesting additional info. But have I understood it correctly? And what does "company not in 1946" actually mean?

Are you saying that Frank Eisner's move to Ireland was at the very beginning of the newly formed Waterford glassworks and that the location was Ballytruckle? From the wikipedia info on Waterford Crystal it states that the new company (after the closure of the original in 1851) was formed in 1947.

So is the new info you have given suggesting that Frank Esiner moved (presumably directly from Lemington) to Waterford (Ballytruckle) in 1947? And that in 1952 (or thereabouts) he moved back to England to be (or become) General Manager of William Swingewood's glassworks in Stourbridge?

As you suggested in an earlier post, I suppose the "M C" on the weight could conceivably tie in with the 1947 Waterford glassworks founders, Charles Bacik & Mirsolav Havel. Any guesses, though, on what the "W R" on the other weight, shown in the Scottish Paperweights book, could link to? [For general info, anyone checking the book will note that sadly no mention was made that the weight was engraved to the base with Waterford etc. - it was at that time included as probably made at Moncrieef's in the 1930s.]
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: paperweights on October 20, 2011, 03:51:41 AM
I don't know if it helps or muddies the water, but in 2006 I sold an "Ysart" Spitfire paperweight I sold on eBay.  The bottom had an inscription on the bottom "Frank Eisner, Lemington, 1944." 

(http://paperweights.com/pw1934.jpg)

http://paperweights.com/pw1934.jpg (http://paperweights.com/pw1934.jpg)

The paperweight is also shown in Colin Mahoney's book on Paul Ysart (pages 168 & 169). 
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on October 20, 2011, 11:42:21 AM
No mention of the Swingwood company in 46 Gazette.

Eisner was at Swingewood's until 1949/1950 when he went to Waterford as soda glass was first produced. Until that point Waterford had been importing Belgian blanks. How they persuaded Eisner then a manager to be a glass-blower again is an interesting question, perhaps he preferred that and also to be part of a new enterprise. The question of making Lead Crystal was not in the equation until Johnstown factory opened in Late 1951.

Of the names Havel mentions, none tie in with W R.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Gary on November 19, 2011, 09:46:56 PM
I spent the day at Perth museum doing some research with the Monart archives and came across this page among other Monart office material, photos etc, this would indicate there was a F Eisner working at Moncrieff's at the same time as P Ysart and Chick Young.
Gary
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: KevinH on November 20, 2011, 01:11:35 AM
Gary, that's very interesting. I wonder when that sheet was written at what it actually relates to. And what might "Acc" refer to in that heading?

Data on Chic Young says that, except for his national service period, he was at Moncrieff's from 1946 to 1960, so the info could refer to something over a spread of at least 16 years. If we knew the dates applicable to all those other folk, perhaps something would become apparent.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Gary on November 20, 2011, 12:08:54 PM
A possibility that Acc office staff stands for Account office staff. The sheet was in the "Trade Price List" booklet with other pre and post war Monart office material. This picture of the Ysart's at work was one of many photos in with the booklet.
Gary
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on November 23, 2011, 12:10:58 AM
We do know that in the 60s that he did go into Moncrieffs on Saturdays, after retiring to Perth. What we do not know is when he left Waterford and if he went elsewhere then. We also know that he did NOT work at Moncrieffs from 1962.

It would be more useful to split these posts out of this thread and merge into the Eisner thread to keep this data in the right place. [Mod: This has now been done (24 Nov 2011) - but at some stage we might also need to centralise other bits about the Eisners from several other threads.]

Also don't discount that

1. The F may be an E (Post 1953 then)
2. Frank may have been offered the same discounts as staff as a professional courtesy.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Gary on September 04, 2012, 06:12:33 PM
Update on Frank Eisner, whilst doing some research at A.K. Bell library Perth in among the Moncrieff archives there is an full page article in the Evening Telegraph (local paper) dated August 20th 1958, on all aspects of Moncrieff Glassworks, interviews included among a few other workers was Paul Ysart and Frank Eisner whose job title was given as production foreman (age 69), it also mentions his son Eric who was a chemist assistant at the same time.
As an aside there is mention in the article, of Frank Eisner making paperweights during the second world war but only as a hobby.
Gary
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: RAY on September 04, 2012, 06:45:04 PM
dont think its ACC , looks to me like all office staff .. as the letter L is the same in the peoples names .. some nice research going on the Gary well done
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Anne on September 04, 2012, 08:49:04 PM
I agree with Ray, I meant to mention this when I looked at it ages back and then it slipped my mind, but it looks more like All Office Staff than Acc Office Staff to me too.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Gary on September 04, 2012, 09:03:43 PM
Thanks Ray, doing research is a pleasure for me. I agree with both of you's it is "all office staff" and not acc.
Gary
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 04, 2012, 10:40:04 PM
That is a good bit of info, said they would be a goldmine. His age ties in with the suggestion that he retired to Perth and obviously took the job post-retirement. I believe he also made some weights at Waterford after the war...not sure if that is mentioned in this thread... to busy to read back right now.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Gary on September 06, 2012, 09:06:47 PM
The following paragraph is taken from the same article as above (Evening Telegraph).

" In the Second World War he was decorated for his part in manufacturing radar screens. When Sir Stafford Cripps visited the Newcastle factory he and all the party were presented with paperweights, Mr Eisner makes them to but as a hobby.
 Sir Stafford was then Minister of Aircraft Production and appropriately incoperated an aeroplane. He was delighted with but handed it back to Mr Eisner and asked him to sign it. So the signature was inscribed with acid
".

In my earlier post I wrote Eric Eisner Job was a chemist assistant but should read chemist and assistant works manager.
Gary
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 06, 2012, 10:20:54 PM
Eric was later the works manager. But it is great to have this confirmation of his father working there as due to his retirement there was no logic to him having worked there and the Colin Mayor being a friend as well as MD it was odd that he had no knowledge of this but did know Frank made paperweights at Moncrieff's on Saturdays. Most of which shattered as he used the MS1 metal which did not work well with colours. So it looks like we finally get some completion on the Frank Eisner story. Well done Gary.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Gary on September 07, 2012, 10:48:09 AM
After rereading this thread, Evening Telegraph article and the Moncreiff Company records, there requires a few updates on dates and people who worked at Moncrieff's.
Chic Young started at Moncrieff's on the 31/3/47 (not 1946), left to do his National Service (can't find a date for that as yet) returned to Moncrieff's 14/4/52 and finally left on 30/3/62, one week before Paul who left on the 6/4/62 (Moncrieff Company records).
Frank Eisner was 69 years old in 1958 (Evening Telegraph) that would mean he was born circa 1889.
John Smith assisted Paul Ysart along with Chic Young in the Monart workshop (Evening Telegraph), John Smith worked at Moncrieff's from 24/4/56 to 28/7/66 (Moncrieff Company records).
Bernard Wade made glass swans while the reporter was at the factory doing the article (Evening Telegraph), he started at Moncrieff's on the 3/2/1958 (Moncrieff Company records).
Gary
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on September 10, 2012, 02:15:33 PM
Swans covered here... http://ysartglass.com/Moncrieff/MoncrieffProduct.htm

lots to be updated...

But can we get/keep non- Eisner out of this topic please. Moderator?
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: tonysherwin on May 23, 2013, 10:31:38 AM
Saw your reference to John Moncrieffs and thought you might like to see the photos attached. They were taken between 1955 and 1962 and show my late father who was a glassblower there.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: millarart on May 23, 2013, 10:40:05 AM
Saw your reference to John Moncrieffs and thought you might like to see the photos attached. They were taken between 1955 and 1962 and show my late father who was a glassblower there.
great pictures and nice to see them
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on August 05, 2014, 01:17:02 AM
Tony, I would love to have an article about your father for Scotland's Glass if you could do it please.
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Anne on July 10, 2017, 11:20:38 PM
Having a few free credits for the genealogy record site ScotlandsPeople I looked up the Eisners and found dates of death for them, if they are of interest.

Deaths
Last name, forename, age, year of death, place
EISNER, Emily Elizabeth, 77, 1968, Perth < --- Frank's wife b. 1890 (ref 1939 Register) maiden name Mickova or Miekova *
EISNER, Frank Joseph, 81, 1971, Perth < --- Frank Eisner b. 1889 (ref 1939 Register)
EISNER, Kathleen Nichol, 67, 1996, Perth < --- Eric's wife b. 1929 married 1952 Northumberland South
EISNER, Eric Carl, 79, 2006, Perth < --- Frank's son Eric Eisner b. 1926 Wakefield (one of twin boys, the other died age 5)

There are descendants of Eric still around. I have names if anyone wants to try and contact them for more info.

* No idea where Emily and Frank were married. No marriage shows up for them in British or Irish records. Maiden name is shown in birth record for Eric and his twin.

There is a record in the National Archives about Frank's naturalisation in 1919:
Nationality and Naturalisation: Eisner, Frank, from Czechoslovakia.
Resident in Birmingham.
Certificate 4,740 issued 23 September 1919.

In 1939 Frank and Emily are shown as living in Newburn R.D., Northumberland, presumably whilst Frank was working at Lemington Glass as per his BEM citation in the London Gazette:

SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 9 JANUARY, 1946 page 323
Awarded BEM 1st Jan 1946 - Frank EISNER, Glassblower, Lemington Glass Company
Title: Re: Frank Eisner
Post by: Frank on July 11, 2017, 09:52:10 PM
Thanks Anne