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Recent Posts

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1
British & Irish Glass / Re: Chris Thornton vase for show
« Last post by chopin-liszt on Today at 06:24:09 PM »
You saw it life sized to start off with. I saw a thumbnail.  :-[
It's got well balanced and very attractive proportions.
2
British & Irish Glass / Re: Sowerby Uranium Spill Vase
« Last post by NevB on Today at 09:18:02 AM »
Thanks cagney, that clarifies it.
3
Glass / Re: Clear 14.5" Swung Glass Vase, Slightly UV-Active
« Last post by Lustrousstone on Today at 08:10:01 AM »
The pattern is cutting so if your vase is the same but without cutting, you may have your answer. Have you looked though here https://chataboutdg.com/gallery/
4
British & Irish Glass / Re: Chris Thornton vase for show
« Last post by glassobsessed on Today at 07:15:27 AM »
Pretty sure that there are silver salts in that trailing, certainly looks that way. The colours come across a fair bit deeper than they appear in the flesh while shape wise it has me thinking flask.
5
Glass / Re: Clear 14.5" Swung Glass Vase, Slightly UV-Active
« Last post by Carnivant on Today at 04:04:52 AM »
Thank you!

That made me think to start checking EAPG pages (as I know quite a few of them have Manganese). Still haven't found my exact vase, but a similar flower pedestal seems to have been used by the US Glass Co., as pictured here:
https://eapgs.net/full-images.php?idx=101629&pat=3579

Obviously, the one in the above link actually has a pattern, but I am still looking.  :)
6
Glass Trinket Sets / Re: Uranium Green Atomiser Bottle
« Last post by Anne on Yesterday at 10:52:36 PM »
The ridge round the top usually indicates an atomiser Nev. It's not a pattern I recognise either, but I'll keep my eyes open and see if I can find an ID for you.
7
Glass / Re: Aseda Denby Milner Swedish Vase ID and definition of Skol?
« Last post by womantiques on Yesterday at 07:20:47 PM »
Thank you for your info. I've seen a few listings of this pattern with the word SKOL, not SKLO, and definition of SKOL is both "cheers" and "bowl." so maybe the others had typos, too!

Do you know anything about the pattern - "Milner?" -- or have Aseda or Denby reference sites?
8
British & Irish Glass / Re: Chris Thornton vase for show
« Last post by chopin-liszt on Yesterday at 06:41:30 PM »
Are there silver salts in the trailing?
I do rather like the vibrant colours and all the various different shades that appear because glass is glass and it does extra things with space and colours and light. 8) 8) 8)
It's kind of reminiscent of a lightbulb, shape wise,
 
9
Glass / Re: Aseda Denby Milner Swedish Vase ID and definition of Skol?
« Last post by chopin-liszt on Yesterday at 06:35:29 PM »
Hello and welcome.   :)
I'm not sure about what glassmaking company Denby used for making their glassware, but I can tell you yes, it is the same Denby as the stoneware.

You may have a minor typo causing your trouble with finding the definition of the word SKLO.
It just means glass.

Just have a little patience, somebody else who does know more will probably come along soon. 8)
10
Glass Books / NEW BOOK: CHANCE REFLECTIONS (and it's free!)
« Last post by David E on Yesterday at 11:31:29 AM »
I am pleased to announce that the first volume of Chance Reflections, covering the period from c.1500 to 1836, is now available to download, absolutely free of charge. No catches, except that each page is watermarked. I may review this later.

Please go to www.chancebrothers.uk (without the .co) and from the homepage the PDF can be seen listed at the bottom.

Chance Brothers was founded in 1822 and became the largest glassmakers in Victorian Britain. From 1850, the company moved into lighthouse optics; in 1851 it glazed the Crystal Palace for the International Exhibition of that year. It also pioneered rolled plate glass and entered the highly competitive domestic glassware market from 1924. By 1947 it successfully developed the interchangeable glass syringe, a huge boost when the founding of the NHS was in 1948.

If it could be made in glass, Chance made it.

I would like to take the opportunity to thank Dr Malcolm Dick for writing the foreword and Giles Chance for excellent financial analysis.

Future volumes (10 in total) will follow in time. It is impossible for me to forecast when the next volume will be ready, but I will update the website periodically.

The current word count for the entire 10 volumes is around 670,000, and there is still much to do! If you have any comments or queries, please contact me.

David Encill
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