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Glass Discussion & Research. No ID requests here please. => British & Irish Glass => Topic started by: sph@ngw on September 18, 2007, 04:59:51 PM

Title: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: sph@ngw on September 18, 2007, 04:59:51 PM
I ask this for as many of you may have read, and a few seen, we have opened a Museum of 20th century British Domestic Glass at Nazeing Glass Works.
I have chosen a few I knew and liked starting with Geoffrey Baxter, Ronnie Stennett-Willson, Frank Thrower, Michael Harris ( responsible for starting 4  glass factories- is this a record?), Roger Phillippo, (our in house designer Wild Rose, Executive Suite, etc)..but who else?
Keith Murray? Irene Stevens? Margaret Casson, David Queensbury? Colin Terris? Dairmoid O'Brien (forgive crap spelling!) and  Jane Beebe
Suggestions are welcome!
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 18, 2007, 05:23:06 PM
Spelling: Domhnall Ó Broin

Is the criteria Domestic Glassware? What are the exclusions/inclusions?
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Ivo on September 18, 2007, 06:15:22 PM
What an insular perspective.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Sklounion on September 18, 2007, 06:35:12 PM
With respect to Ivo's reservations and (imho) justifiable view:
Hardie Williamson, RY Goodden, Annette Meech, John Clappison. E Downey...Luxton, Sutherland, Keith Murray ad infinitum.....
Yes I understand the insular view, but Kny, Pfohl, Frankenhauser and others have all been influential.... British design does not exist in a vacuum, without the exchange and re-interpretation, that the international migration of ideas brings.
Marcus

Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 18, 2007, 08:06:06 PM
Actually Domnhall is out too, Irish.

I was a little taken aback by the insular remark, after all it is a Museum about British glass and as we know does include non-British items. So the criteria of the exhibits if applied to Domestic Glass designers will allow for non-British inclusions.

But what is the harm in displaying just Brits? I suppose a simple parallel would be a railway train where the first carriage is British, next French, then Dutch, then a few more British... take out the non Brits and only one coach reaches its destination. So trying to illustrate 20th Century domestic glass design with only Brits results in an incomplete picture which will surely leave the observer wondering. In the late 1920's the British government were exhorting the UK glass makers to learn lessons from other countries in the use of designers... indeed it was a German, Peter Behrens, that is widely considered to be the father of Industrial Design. If the 20th century was the first century of design as a discipline then any exhibition is surely at its best if can tell a complete story. A museum is an educational resource and as such has a duty to educate as well as preserve history. A British industrial museum has a right to be just that, but as I think about it, I realise that value would be increased by telling a complete story. Showing how different 'nationalities' have worked together as 'one people' to create, for example, a glass pot totally suited to the task of holding asparagus spears. How the different elements evolved with influences from everywhere and how a British company brought it to market with some 'British' twists, while at the same time it was launched in 20 other countries with localised twists...

Perhaps we also need to consider the modern information age where ideas have few borders, like these forums. I recall not long ago, a US Glass designer consulted this board for ideas for a Swedish glass works. The input came from many countries.

But Stephen, you started with a list but did not clearly state what you were trying to reach. Perhaps that makes a difference in how it is perceived.

A complication is that is sometimes unclear who a designer was. There is no doubt that Monart has had a major impact on glass design in Scotland and to some extent England too. (No, it was not copied from Scheider, nor Daum, nor Baccarat, perhaps influenced by LeGras but that is unconfirmed). The original concept is fairly well agreed to be Salvador Ysart circa 1922, later Mrs Moncrieff was said to be responsible for all of the designs, yet she was out of the picture by the mid 30's. Ian Turner recently showed that Paul Ysart was heavily involved in the pattern books as they are annotated in his hand - a remarkable discovery considering how often he was interviewed in his later life. But there you are left with 3 names to pick on as THE designer - but chronologically Salvador came first, does that entitle him. Did he work with Mrs Moncrieff in creating the drawings, were the 300+ shapes a team effort? Perhaps the designer is better stated as Moncrieff design Team! But none were formally trained in design, nor attended art school, does that make them amateurs - can amateurs be allowed in to the hallowed hall of 'Designer'.  :angel:
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Max on September 18, 2007, 10:28:37 PM
Quote
So trying to illustrate 20th Century domestic glass design with only Brits results in an incomplete picture which will surely leave the observer wondering.

Fraaaaaaaaank!  It's not an ideal world out there, and a museum has to start somewhere.  Surely the most important thing is securing items for preservation before the history is lost?  We could argue which nationalilities should be included until the cows come home...but it's not progress for the museum, is it?   :huh:

I just can't imagine the complexities of starting a museum from scratch.  I guess one has to keep it simple to start with?






Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 19, 2007, 08:34:02 AM
 :) Sure Max. I was discussing issues raised and exploring them, not particularly making judgements.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Bernard C on September 19, 2007, 11:43:18 AM
You all appear to have forgotten the two most influential, Adam Dodds I, and Ernest Jobling-Purser.

Bernard C.  8)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Glen on September 19, 2007, 12:20:54 PM
You all appear to have forgotten the two most influential, Adam Dodds I, and Ernest Jobling-Purser.

Bernard C.  8)

You took the words right out of my mouth, Bernard. Adam Dodds I for his Tynesyde Glassware (and more). And may I add John Jenkins too?
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Bernard C on September 19, 2007, 12:42:58 PM
You all appear to have forgotten the two most influential, Adam Dodds I, and Ernest Jobling-Purser.

Bernard C.  8)

You took the words right out of my mouth, Bernard. Adam Dodds I for his Tynesyde Glassware (and more). And may I add John Jenkins too?

I forgot to say why.   Thanks, Glen, for explaining Adam's grandfather.   I included Ernest Jobling-Purser, not for his 1930s art glass, much of it modelled by Etienne Franckhauser (sic), but for his Pyrex.

What was important was what was sold in huge quantities in Woolworth's, Home & Colonial, and the Co-op, not expensive glass sold to the wealthy in a handful of London shops.

Now, Glen, who was John Jenkins?   I've heard the name before, but I can't remember where!

Bernard C.  8)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: David E on September 19, 2007, 12:54:38 PM
Howard Stabler (Orlak, but whose designs were then used for Pyrex - Jobling), Margaret Casson (Night Sky), David Hammond (Webb) are others. Marcus has already mentioned others within my particular sphere of interest.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Glen on September 19, 2007, 12:55:53 PM
Bernard - a huge "yes" to all you said above.

You asked about John Jenkins: he was the British impetus (business and design) for the Barolac range of glass, working with Inwald in Czechoslovakia. Although much of it was decorative, it was also functional glassware.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: NazeingResearch on September 19, 2007, 01:29:41 PM
What an insular perspective.

Does glass make people angry, or does it just attract angry people?

If you go to Dartington, you can look at Dartington Glass. If you go to Caithness, you can look at Caithness Glass, and the same rule applies to what few factories are still operating in the country. You can come to Nazeing, and see Glass made from the vast majority of all the factories that produced glass between 1900 and the present day in Britain, as well as glass from Scandinavia, France, Germany, Italy to name a few. In addition to that there is a room dedicated to influenced and influencial designers who worked with factories from all over the world. Not only that, but you are being asked, which designers you think should be mentioned and even exhibited in the museum. How often does that happen?

On a different note completely, I vote I be included as well as Adam Dodds and Bernard. I drew a picture of a glass once, and it looked quite good.  :P

fin
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 19, 2007, 01:47:08 PM
Bear in mind that Holland has a National Glass Museum and the general advice to those interested in glass is often - do not bother to visit it.

The original request was unclear as to the criteria/intentions of what is being planned as that, obviously, has a bearing on such suggestions.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Adam on September 19, 2007, 03:37:50 PM
Although I know that he was a very good manager and possibly innovator, is there any evidence that my grandfather ever designed anything?  As many know, I never actually knew him.  He appeared in the 1901 (I think) census as Works Cashier.

Adam D.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Glen on September 19, 2007, 03:56:04 PM
Adam, my reference is Cottle ('Sowerby Gateshead Glass'). Your grandfather, Adam Dodds, is noted as taking over the position of manager at Sowerby's in 1907, as Henry Pitt's replacement. Cottle credits your grandfather with the introduction of the Tynesyde Glassware range in the late 1920s "in a variety of new, moulded and cut shapes". It's possible that Herr Schottner (p 39 Cottle) who was "recruited as a designer" was involved in this too.

Cottle notes that your grandfather was associated with the company over for 50 years. His time as Manager coincides with the introduction of Carnival (Rainbo and Sunglow) at Sowerby's. He is (to my way of thinking) of great significance.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Adam on September 20, 2007, 08:24:56 PM
Glen - I think my rather short last posting has given the wrong impression.  I of course knew of all the facts which you gave and was certainly not running down my grandfather.  Everyone who knew him thought highly of him (even my mother, who was not known for seeing the best in people!).  He retrieved the company with a long struggle after taking over from the infamous Pitt.  I am certain that the period when he was in charge of Sowerbys and his great friend Tom Davidson was in charge of Davidsons was one of the high points, if not THE high point of Gateshead glassmaking.  Perhaps my definition of the word "designers" is a bit too narrow - I thought that it meant the people, many with a background of art, who sit down and produce designs on paper and then, perhaps, follow them through to production.

My grandfather, following his early career only from the census records, had a business and/or accounting type of background.  He certainly developed into a very able, possibly brilliant manager and undoubtedly deserves full credit for all the innovations which you mention.  He obviously gave every encouragement to whatever designers he either employed or consulted.  I only wish I had known him (but if I had, statistically I would probably not be here now!).  My only query was whether or not he was a hands-on designer as I understand the term.  Maybe he did some of that as well - I honestly don't know, which was why I raised the query.

Adam D.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: sph@ngw on September 22, 2007, 08:40:26 AM
Thank you for these replies. helpful, unhelpful and critical! May i just explain the reason for this little museum   :mus:.
I have been connected with glass for over 50 years (I started aged seven in the packing dept on Saturday mornings at 2/6d (about15p) for a morning's work; dodging the factory inspector's visit (luckily seldom on a Saturday!) but holidays as well.. (shades of Kingsley's Water Babies!), when I was sent to play!" in the sand pit!
I celebrate this year, 40 years, working in glass, including working in France for St Louis, Baccarat, and the French Glass Federation. I have visited over 48 glass factories - I will not bore you with the list -in the UK and Europe, most of which have now closed. (Sorry this may sound like bragging but it is the truth!)! I also knew, as colleagues and friends, Geoffrey Baxter (I went over to Whitefriars in Harrow about twelve times between 1970 and 1980 when they closed and bought about 8 paperweights directly from Geoff,), Frank Thrower of Dartington (one of the most charming talented and self effacing people I have ever met), Michael Harris, highly talented soft spoken charmer, Ronnie Stennett-Willson, (back in the 1970's), and most of bosses of the British Domestic glass companies between 1970 and today. I wish to pay tribute to them in the Museum.
 I also chaired the Hand Made Glass Section  at the Glass Manufacturer's Federation from 1982 to 1986, and was a member of The Council until it moved to Sheffield, when I stepped down, due to distance. I also chaired the Science Museum Glass Gallery from 1979 to 1989, and am still chair of the British Glass Education Trust since 1979! So glass is important to me, it keeps me and my family clothed, housed and fed, this is not a hobby!

It was NOT my original idea to set up a Museum. Andy McC in writing his Miller's Guide of 20th Century Glass, and meeting me for the first time asked, 
"Stephen, why do you not collect glass?"
"Are you mad, I am surrounded by it all day long, give me a break!"
"But you have known all these guys, you are the last link left!"
That last remark never occurred to me so starting with 30 inherited pieces, I started collecting what I liked and regard as typical of everyday use... not the stuffy Museum pieces at auction, glass of the people, used  and loved by us our parents and grandparents.   
So blame Andy he has broad shoulders!
My aim is not just to display British glass from the 20th century. We have researched in detail over 80 British companies, written, briefly their histories, displayed them on a map of the UK, and recorded the reasons for the decline of the British Industry.
(For instance on Tuesday the grand daughters of two glass makers from the Albert Glass Works in Vauxhall in the 1870's are coming to show me pieces of glass made there and inherited by them, plus records that may fill in another small pieces of the missing jig-saw of the past!)
Sadly I believe it will never recover, BUT on the brighter side there are some great glass artists and studios and I venture to say the British, ( I shall not name names...!) are among the best in the world, (We do show examples from about 10!).
Andy and I believe we have a unique resource, the ability to both visit a glass museum and see glass still being made near London (yes, both Caithness and Dartington do this!). But they do not illustrate, inform and perhaps educate people into the beauty, talent and range of British Domestic Glass. Come and see it - special offer up to Christmas of £2.50 a head (free if if you spend £25 in the factory shop!) - and then please pick it to pieces! We learn from constructive criticism, we learn little from praise or flattery! As French writer Georges Duhamel said, "Conserver c'est encore creer" ("To conserve is still a creative act".)

For instance, we have just learned that Len Kempton, who left our company in the late 1930's and died in 1993 (I think!) was a pioneer in the New Zealand Glass industry and made glass well into his Eighties! We have the NZ press cuttings and photos to prove it! 
Angela, any interest?
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 22, 2007, 10:52:20 AM
Thanks for that Stephen, I do hope that you give yourself a credit in your displays too. Hopefully in the next couple of years I will get to the UK and come visit.

I think what you are doing is grand!
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Heidimin on September 22, 2007, 10:54:05 AM
I have no problems with the concept of a museum of British domestic glass production - in fact, I think it's a great idea. Every museum has to have its own focus and I'm sure influences from other countries will be apparent in their impact on British designers.

On designers, I would definitely include AHW - I may be partisan, but he contributed some of Bagley's most distinctive designs, was a leading figure in the move away from "pseudo-cut glass" in the late 30s and post-war period, took mass-produced decorated tumblers to a new level, and was for 30 years chief designer for one of the largest British domestic glass producers of the second half of the C20th (Sherdley/ Ravenhead).

I'm not so sure about Annette Meech - I admire the small number of designs she did for Ravenhead, but she was/is primarily an art glass designer. John Clappison designed a large number of ranges for Ravenhead in the mid-70s, but this was a relatively short interlude in a career primarily focussed on ceramics.

Harold Stabler not Howard btw.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Glen on September 24, 2007, 07:13:22 AM
Adam - first, my apologies for not responded to you sooner, but I have been away at a Carnival Glass convention and have only just returned. Second, my apologies for misunderstanding you earlier. I fully understand now exactly what you're saying and I'm really grateful to you for those further, fascinating insights into your grandfather.

I was certainly interpreting "designer" in a much looser and wider way than perhaps I should, for the purposes of this thread. I didn't mean to suggest that your grandfather had actually made the drawings etc for the Sowerby pieces, but that he was the impetus behind it all.

May I also take this opportunity to correct myself earlier too....I was rushing (last week was exceptionally pressured and rushed for me) and I wrote John Jenkins when I meant Douglas Jenkins from the company John Jenkins.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: David E on September 24, 2007, 07:26:30 AM
Quote from: Heidi
Harold Stabler not Howard btw.

Looks like we were both rushing Glen! I just noticed Heidi's comment - not the first time I've made this mistake and he'll probably be Hubert or Humphrey next time around! :D

I also agree that sometimes people heavily involved with 'producing' ground-breaking designs, might not have actually been the designer, but the impetus. Credit is still due to these people for their vision.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: ChrisStewart on September 24, 2007, 07:47:41 AM
Don't forget Thomas Davidson. he designed most of Davidson's glass between 1890 and his death in 1937. And of course he invented pearline, cloud glass and the flower dome.

Chris
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Glen on September 24, 2007, 07:54:44 AM
Don't forget Thomas Davidson.

He gets my vote too.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: josordoni on September 24, 2007, 08:12:54 AM
So interesting Stephen, now that the museum is open, I must come and visit.  If it is a nice day, maybe I'll take a boat out at Broxbourne too!

Moderator: Excessive quote removed
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 24, 2007, 08:48:51 AM
... but that he was the impetus behind it all...

Which would put an entirely different twist on things. Yet there is surely a dilemma in pre, say, 1930 when there were few people recognised as 'designers' and often they were anonymous employees. Designer obsession and indeed the discipline of design history barely existed 20 years ago and most of those that did have a following then were firstly major as architects or artists. Glen is emphasising that management had a major impact on design in that it chose to allow, disallow or encourage in an industry that, in the UK, was largely conservative and reluctant to embrace change.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Sklounion on September 24, 2007, 10:14:16 AM
Hi,
Whilst design history is a relatively modern phenomena, after 1950, there was very clearly a shift in British industry as a whole, toward the use of designers. Some of this was a response to two major exhibitions, "Britain can Make It" and the Festival of Britain, but arguably also a response to reducing market share as imported glass from Scandinavia and Czechoslovakia, made its impact. The use, by certain UK  glassmakers, of the Design Research Unit, (Jobling)  members of the Society of Industrial Artists, (GEC) and various RDIs (Royal Designer for Industry) (Chance) is relatively well documented, such designers were instrumental in leading change, and few of those designers were primarily architects or artists. Irene Stevens clearly specialised in glass, and was the first female glass designer to have worked in the British glass industry (I may be mistaken).
Designer recognition (rather than obsession) was apparent in the 1960s.
Marcus

Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 24, 2007, 11:07:59 AM
Yes, I was referring to the earlier part of the century but added confusion by then talking about managements importance which was more general. I readily admit to very patchy knowledge in this area particularly after 1950.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: sph@ngw on September 26, 2007, 06:16:55 PM
May I thank all those who have contributed names and ides of British Glass Designers. missing of course is Christopher Dresserregarded perhaps as teh faher of modern British designer ( along with Rennie Mackintsoh in Scotland!
yes, he did design manynon glass items, but i hope to feature him and many of the otehr names mentioned.
My next plan is a tribute to the late great Peter Deiser, MBE one of the nicest and most talented people I hav ever met!
We worked together on a few projects including the amazing ruby glass cone, ( one of the last things made at Thomas Webb's Dennis Hall Works!, now on loan to the Science Museum,.
It was commissioned for the Glass Gallery set up in the 1960's by The Glass manufacturer's Federation in  Portland Place, ( noe British Glass in Sheffield) with coloured windows designed by  David Queensberry (another great name of British design, sadly overlooked!).

Anyway, hopefully "Peter Dreiser MBE, Engraver Extrodinaire" - together with the Guild of Glass Engravers support, will be an exhibition for Spring 2008 to look forward to, in a large hi tech state of the art setting,
( actually some refurbished  air conditioned prestige offices  I iam commandeering for the purpose before reletting them!) So no " Black Hole of Calcutta" for those members of the Glass Circle who visited in June! ( A Training room planned for 20 with 32 visitors, and no air con on a very warm day...Sorry!)

A tribute to this gentle talented giant who I believe to be the finest copper wheel engraver of the 20th century and who died last autumn, is badly overdue!  S.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 26, 2007, 08:43:16 PM
Can I suggest that you complement your exhibitions with a permanent set of web pages, illustrating everything in the exhibition with good sized images... you could start it towards the end of the exhibition perhaps?
 :)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: aa on September 26, 2007, 09:12:24 PM
I'm not so sure about Annette Meech - but she was/is primarily an art glass designer.

Where do you draw the line? There are some important studios that produce(d) domestic glassware. It just depends what your criteria are.
Just because it was hand made doesn't mean it wasn't significant.

Cowdy Glass (Pauline Solven) and Lindean Mill (David Kaplan and Annica Sandstrom) spring to mind, among others as producing some outstanding work. However, the entire output of the whole lifespan of those studios is significantly less than what the Arc group produces per hour!

Annette Meech also designed a range of tableware (wine glasses) for Cowdy.

If you are trying to establish who the important designers are, I would advise against using criteria that include either scale of production or method of production and try to judge purely on an aesthetic basis.



Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 26, 2007, 10:26:53 PM
I think Adam makes important points (for new members: Adam is a glass artist/designer/gallery of international repute.) and I think amply illustrates that this a subject of incredible depth.

The collective reactions to Stephen's/Nazeing Museum original requests shows that glass collectors, researchers and makers have a lot to say on the subject. But to address the original question it is possibly unhelpful and clearly it will not be possible to just make a list of the 'designers' we know about. I would suggest that a new thread be created to try and explore the subject in greater depth to try and get a better picture of 20th century glass design with a focus on British Glass. (Wider might be asking too much?). Perhaps this could lead to a list of people and what their impact was.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: sph@ngw on September 27, 2007, 03:41:59 PM
Great idea Frank, I second that!
Stephen
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on September 27, 2007, 04:25:03 PM
I thought Keith Murray was a Kiwi,have i got it wrong,
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Cathy B on September 29, 2007, 01:33:45 AM
Keith Murray was definitely a Kiwi, but he did all of his work in the UK. He's too important to omit, I think.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Bernard C on September 29, 2007, 04:37:09 AM
Quote from: aa
... If you are trying to establish who the important designers are, I would advise against using criteria that include either scale of production or method of production and try to judge purely on an aesthetic basis.

How?   You will get a different view from everyone.   Ideally importance should be based on something that can be evaluated, albeit very roughly, like success in monetary terms.   And I think there is a good case for including influential innovative designs and techniques as well, whether or not they were financially successful in their original form, as long as eventually they led to successful designs.

On a minor point, I wish I could see some distinction between the 1930s emergence of signed designer goods as a marketing strategy and what is being discussed here, important designers.   There is some overlap, but they are not the same.

Bernard C.  8)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: aa on September 29, 2007, 09:37:18 AM
Bernard
Here is a good example: http://www.bernard.cavalot.btinternet.co.uk/dj7cp2_view.jpg

Super jam pot. Designer unknown. Quantity produced unknown. Quote from you:  "I think this little pot was probably a trade sample from a projected range that was subsequently rejected. Hence its rarity - I have not found anyone who has ever seen anything like it before."

Quite possibly should be in  a museum. It doesn't matter how many were produced or how it was produced.

Many great designs and designers are/were not financially successful and often it can be difficult to find examples remaining.



Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on September 29, 2007, 10:05:06 AM
I am happy to include Keith Murray as i have three of his decanters all with glasses including one very early one.i also have a Paul Nash decanter maybe we should include him.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Bernard C on September 29, 2007, 11:26:44 AM
Nice try, Adam, but you couldn't have chosen a worse example for this topic, as it's Fostoria's American pattern, albeit made by Davidson, probably from a Fostoria mould loaned to Davidson for evaluation purposes.   Nevertheless you made me laugh — important as this topic was getting much too serious.
Bernard C.  :love:
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 29, 2007, 11:40:02 AM
Moderators can you perhaps execute this suggestion, the original thread could retain a list of names, mentioned so far and the rest of the posts split into a new thread stickied to the top. Give it 6 months then start others on other countries...  :)


... I would suggest that a new thread be created to try and explore the subject in greater depth to try and get a better picture of 20th century glass design with a focus on British Glass. (Wider might be asking too much?). Perhaps this could lead to a list of people and what their impact was.

Great idea Frank, I second that!
Stephen
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: nigel benson on October 16, 2007, 07:58:35 PM
Can I suggest that you complement your exhibitions with a permanent set of web pages, illustrating everything in the exhibition with good sized images... you could start it towards the end of the exhibition perhaps?
 :)

Whilst I understand the logic behind this Frank, might it not reduce the need to visit the exhibition? Great if you are unable to visit if you live too far away, but possibly a little self-defeating if your aim is to get footfall? I do recognise the need for online resources, but in my opinion there is no substitute for seeing the three-dimensional item wherever possible. Maybe something that achieves a result for both terrestial and internet visitors, or even a comprehensive catalogue? 

I was away when this thread was started and discussed I'm afraid. Whilst there are indeed a number of helpful suggestions for Stephen to consider it leaves me with the over-riding feeling that the initial question has not been answered (or if it has, it is not coherent).  Many ideas have been introduced, but without seemingly considering what the motivator behind this project (Stephen) wants to achieve. Moreover, has anyone considered the budget that might be available or the space that has been given over for the time being? Lets be realistic, neither are likely to be, lets say, along the lines of having access to lottery money, after all everyone has a budget and only so much space available. I would therefore urge people to be sympathetic to the question posed and the posibilities available in order that we can give what little help we can to this project.

Lastly, and I am sorry Frank, as it was your comment about Domhnall O'Broin that made me wonder...............if an Irish designer who created the first ranges for Caithness in the mid 60's is out, then I suppose a family of Spanish glassblowers, who also worked in Scotland, might also be out? ;) :( ;)

I genuinely think if this thread is going to continue then perhaps more thought (maybe even answers to questions) is/are necessary to help give the information that is needed by Stephen for his museum, to whom I wish much success.

Nigel
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 16, 2007, 08:43:27 PM
Fully support your comments Nigel.

The web site suggestion was intended to be for exhibitions, that I assumed to be temporary.

The dilemma of nationality is of course a major one as you illustrate, glass folk had such itchy feet and it makes it very difficult to approach such a list when the question is ambiguous - my first post and those of subsequent posters were looking for a criteria that made it clear. As you can see we went all over the place.

Trying to build something more wide-ranging here, does not leave non-British members feeling left out, and would certainly be helpful in the short term for the original quest and also long term for our community in general. But it needs someone to keep it alive... I am too busy now.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: nigel benson on October 17, 2007, 12:21:34 PM
Hello again,

I'm afraid I didn't see the question  "Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?" as ambiguous, more a question of how long , or how short the list should or could be.

By contributing clearly to a list any names that a contributor interprets as being necessary to include on the list, Stephen could then tailor his requirements within the list that might be achieved (whilst also factoring in his budget and being aware of the space available). The latter can only be known to him and therefore our contribution would be to provide names that maybe suitable. I don't believe that we really need to know the parameters, since the question is fairly straightforward - please add to this basic list/requirement.

Indeed, having curated several exhibitions myself, I am only too aware that the parameters can reveal themselves once the bulk of the information has been collected. It is this information that can be a guide toward something that will, hopefully, be effective. It also allows one to think through what is and isn't necessary for a given project - in this case a Museum of British Domestic Glass.

Influences from other countries, whilst totally valid, can be dealt with on information boards and by using photographs. In other words, an awareness may well be necessary, but the items don't have to be included. As long as folks make this clear when they suggest names then the "criteria" previosly mentioned can all but look after itself.

As for anyone feeling left out of a thread because their interest is within another branch of glass collecting, or because they live abroad ............ surely it is not necessary to comment on everything that goes through these boards? Folks only need to read the thread in order to be included. I know of a number of people who read these boards, but refrain from making comment, and I am sure there are many more throughout the world that enjoy and learn from just this experience of the board.

Personally, I find that when I am able to check out the GMB, I only feel it necessary to comment when I believe I am adding to a debate, or, maybe, when I wish to help with the identity of an item. Of course we ALL learn from these boards, although, sometimes I feel a thread can be interupted by contributions that are best aired through the Cafe since the flow can be lost. Oh! ...... and I am aware that I'm guilty of this as I write, but I hope on this occasion for good reason :)

I did use the word exhibition in my previous post to mean the temporary exhibitions that may occur from time-to-time at the museum, however on re-reading I see that it could well be read in two ways - sorry about that. The point I made about footfall is as valid for the museum as a whole as it was concerning those temporary exhibitions. Furthermore, if people get the idea that they can see the temporary exhibition in the comfort of their own home if they only wait then I would suggest it is even more valid. It may lead to a very active online museum, but it could well lead to a very empty real museum :(

Anyway folks, how about a straightforward list of possible designers whose items (or influences) could be used to illustrate a Museum of British Domestic Glass?

Nigel
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 17, 2007, 04:27:00 PM
So only designers that are native British? And by domestic glass one assumes that covers oven and table ware, food containers, bottles but to exclude vases and ornamental glass? Do we also exclude decoration designers?
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 17, 2007, 04:52:02 PM
1. Q.V.F. (Subsidiary of Joblings) Pyrex waste line and sink traps 1950's (Installation Nottingham University)

2. George B. Ritchie. Assistant designer, Jobling's 1956-?.

1 & 2 source Mixed Batch 1958.

3. Crystalware Limited, designed domestic glass ranges of 1950 standards. (PG Advert Jan 1950)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 17, 2007, 07:51:00 PM
From British Glass Betwen the Wars - Drinkware, tableware. Excluded decorative. n.b. Nationality not indicated.

4. H.J. Powell  (BGBtW p53)
5. Gordon Russell  (BGBtW p54) knighthood in 1955 for services to design.
6. Walter Gilbert  (BGBtW p66)
7. Clyne Farquharson  (BGBtW p67)
8. Alexander H. Williamson  (BGBtW p79)
9. Reginald Gooden  (BGBtW p81)
10. Raymond McGrath with Elizabeth Craig  (BGBtW p82)
11. Homery Folkes  (BGBtW p87)
12. Ernest Procter  (BGBtW p93)
13. Dod Procter  (BGBtW p93)
14. Laura Knight  (BGBtW p94)
15. Eric Ravilious  (BGBtW p94)
16. Gordon Forsyth  (BGBtW p95)
17. Paul Nash  (BGBtW p96)
18. Herbert Webb (BGBtW p100)
19. Keith Murray  (BGBtW p89+ p102)
20. W J Wilson  (BGBtW p102)

What about glass designed by companies like Jules Lang and Clayton Mayers, who had the glass made overseas?
Of course, only Keith Murray was mentioned as an 'important designer' but then important is a somewhat vague term as it is often a value judgement. Perhaps he was inspired by Dod and Ernest Procter which presumably would make them important. FOOTNOTE - No chance, they were painters so probably only decorated the pieces in the Harrods Exhibition.

I potentially regard Raymond McGrath and his collaboration with Elizabeth Craig to be of great importance as his products might prove to be amongst the most commonly used and made in the largest volumes - but also because this was a collaboration of an end user and designer. FOOTNOTE Except he was an Australian  ::)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: aa on October 17, 2007, 10:15:22 PM
I think it would be a good idea to define what is meant by "domestic glass" in this context. Maybe Stephen should elucidate!

In one of Frank's posts above, he seemed to be suggesting that for the purpose of this discussion a vase is not "domestic", but that bottles are. So would that be wine bottles or bleach bottles? And perfume bottles, or is perfume not domestic?  Is there a difference between a perfume bottle that is used for packaging perfume, which may or may not be decorative depending on the imagination of the manufacturer of the perfume, coupled with the profile of the target market, and a perfume bottle that is designed to be used for decanting perfume or would that be decorative and therefore non-domestic?

Also, if we are to exclude decorative designers, should we also disregard domestic glass that is too decorative, or that has decorative qualities?

What about that 20th century icon, the ashtray? Is there a distinction between a domestic ashtray and a non-domestic one - ie, one produced say for pubs and restaurants?

Not entirely tongue-in cheek......

;) :) ;D

Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 18, 2007, 09:11:39 AM
Not entirely tongue-in cheek......

Tut Adam! Nigel said it was an unambiguous question so we should accept that is the case and thus it relates to native designers of glassware designed for use in the home. That does, I suppose, answer my question about glass made abroad and with a company as the designer - clearly included as only designer nationality is stipulated.

Non-domestic ashtrays, ie advertising, hotel and bar ware, are excluded, my list did include at least one ashtray designer!

Perfumes are in my opinion mostly giftware, so excluded - who decants in this day and age when the container is of more importance than the contents! Yet in the past people could have taken their own suite of bottles to the perfumier for filling. Of course if perfumes are felt to be in we can include some Caithness designers - who are currently excluded.

Wine bottles are included in bottles and food containers, but while I can probably think of decoration designers finding who were the designers of bottles will be impossible. I would expect that the majority of domestic glassware, at least Post WW2, is designed by packaging companies design department. Advertising agencies are also designers of domestic packaging too but it can be almost impossible to work out who did what - unless, presumably, you trawl through archives of Packaging and Advertising trade journals.

Mostly only the designers of 'show pieces' or glass made for collectors are ever taken notice of - so it is good that an effort is being made to uncover the people and organisations that made the glass useable.

I still think that it would be beneficial to include non-Brits here - even if that goes beyond Stephens needs - due to the wide community we serve and also because many important design innovations were made by non-British nationals. It is also not always easy to determine the nationality of an individual as usually it is not a part of a mention of their name as designer. While Australian McGrath may have been an important designer of British Pyrex, there are many Pyrex designs that are American designs.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: nigel benson on October 19, 2007, 09:30:31 AM
Hello,

"Nigel said it was an unambiguous question "

No, Frank I did not.

I said that I did not find it so. A little accuracy please.

I have proferred a few thoughts that I believed might help, sadly they appear not to have done :(. Never mind, let us wait for Stephen to pop by.

Nigel


PS. The group of us who went to help at the Museum yesterday felt the day was well spent and had a very enjoyable time handling and discussing the exhibits in the Nazeing room whilst giving the Nazeing collection a bit of an overhaul. Quite a privilege! I hope it was a help to Stephen.

Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 19, 2007, 11:19:50 AM
Quite a privilege!

Indeed, lucky you!

As to the other, so you do think it is ambiguous? Confused  :huh:

Can anyone else add more names? The list as is, is almost empty of pre WW1 and poor after WW11
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 20, 2007, 10:35:21 AM
(PG adverts Aug 1935)

Royal Brierley Crystal
21. H Whitworth
22. R.S. Williams-Thomas
Stuart
23. L Kny
T Webb
24. Hom. Folkes
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: nigel benson on October 20, 2007, 11:39:16 AM
Hiya,

To answer your confusion Frank:

"Nigel said it was an unambiguous question "

This relates to the mis-interpretation you put on my comment in an earlier post.

I said that I did not find it so.

This relates to the original question put by Stephen - in that I do not find the question ambiuous.

I hope that clears the problem up :)



Good to see you putting in so many suggestions Frank :) BTW the names you obtained from the adverts are also in BGBtW ;)

Royal Brierley Crystal:
 
21. H Whitworth              page 11 (again in an advert)
22. R.S. Williams-Thomas  page 11 (again in an advert)

Note. If anyone checks this out, the Keith Murray sherry set is the decanter and glasses at the front of the picture - so read from front to back. Mentioned as I have often spoken to people who have not noticed and have corrulated the items with the captions the wrong way round.

Stuart:

23. L Kny                       page 28 (essay) page 97, 98, etc

T Webb:

24. Hom. Folkes              page 87 - already mentioned in your previous post.


Cheers, Nigel







Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on November 06, 2007, 12:14:06 PM
Can't anyone else add to this list?  :huh:
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: David E on November 06, 2007, 02:00:21 PM
Yes, but all rather Chance-centric! However, I'd prefer to release these details once the book is published. FYI, this is earmarked for the first week in December - yup, it's that close :o
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on November 06, 2007, 02:14:21 PM
 :pty:
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on November 06, 2007, 03:38:39 PM
How about H J Dunne-Cooke.You only have to look in the V&A And other Museums to see his work and how important his contribution was.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Patrick on November 06, 2007, 06:07:56 PM
 Hi, As the grandson of James Hogan I think I should put his name forward to be included on the list........
In 1936 along with Keith Murray,he was awarded the honor "Designer for Industry of the Royal Society of Arts", (abbreviated "R.D.I."). At that time he was chief glass designer at Whitefriars and a fruit bowl,water set and decanter are on display at the V@A. His 9280 Embassy wine suite was used in all British Embassies from 1949 up till 1966.
Best wishes Patrick.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on November 06, 2007, 07:28:21 PM
 I agree with Patrick, his grandfather was also involved with Dunne- Cooke at Whitefriars and they came up with some great designs,D C also designed for a couple of major Swedish companies, but there is little info on him,I am sure at least one of you will put that right.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on November 06, 2007, 07:35:03 PM
Good to see movement and more names!
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: nigel benson on November 06, 2007, 08:56:08 PM

OK, What about adding:

Edinburgh Crystal:

Helen Monro (later Monro-Turner)  Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)
DC Hewat                      Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)
AE Morris                       Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)
F Mungall                       Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)
V Trainer                       Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)
Alexander Chrichton         (pre-war)

Royal Brierley Crystal:

Deanne Meanley              Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)
Tom Hill                         Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)

Stuart & Sons:

AR (Reg) Pearce              Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)
John Luxton                    Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)
Jasper Conran                 1990's onward

Stourbridge Glass Company(Tudor Crystal):

Harry Cuneen                  Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)

T. Webb:

Tom Pitchford                  BGBtW, Art Deco to Post Modernism
Doreen Norgrove              Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)
David Hammond               Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)

Waterford Crystal:

John Rocha                     1990's onward

Webb Corbett:

Freda M  Coleborn            Art Deco to Post Modernism - (pre-war)
Irene Stevens                 Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)
David Smith                    Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)
Len Green                       Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)
David Queensberry           Art Deco to Post Modernism - (post-war)

Whitefriars:

Barnaby Powell                Whitefriars Glass, (Ed. L Jackson)
William Butler                  Whitefriars Glass, (Ed. L Jackson)
Joseph Francis                Whitefriars Glass, (Ed. L Jackson)
Tom Hill                         Whitefriars Glass, (Ed. L Jackson)
Peter Wheeler                 Whitefriars Glass, (Ed. L Jackson)

Bermondsey Glass:

Guy Underwood               Pre-war (These boards and my own research)

There are probably loads more, but I thought I'd add in a few that occurred to me and put in at least one reference about each, where possible.

Nigel
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on November 06, 2007, 10:24:32 PM
 Come On Nigel, you forgot Constance Spry, Brierley,fantastic glass for flower arranging. I know Simon Cottle loves her glass.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: yelooc on November 12, 2007, 01:24:41 PM
I agree with Patrick, his grandfather was also involved with Dunne- Cooke at Whitefriars and they came up with some great designs,D C also designed for a couple of major Swedish companies, but there is little info on him,I am sure at least one of you will put that right.

Hi John, Patrick,

I couldn't resist responding to your last comment! An article on Dunne Cooke will be published in the next Journal of the Glass Association. I found a small archive of material including some original DC design drawings, an original Elfverson catalogue from the mid 1930's (all made by Strombergsyttan and mostly designed by Gerda) and twenty pieces of glass including the DC designs in the V&A. On of the huge cut pieces is monographed DC and one of the books is deadicated to DC from Gerda Stromberg. The glass is being exhibited at the Country Seat from 23rd Nov to 8th Dec.

Enjoy!

Graham
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Patrick on November 12, 2007, 05:17:37 PM
hi Graham, Thanks for that info, I was going to try to get to the exhibition and have been to all the previous ones. They always make a tremendous effort and anyone who can make the trip will not be disappointed.
 Just to put the records straight............ It was my Father Edmond Hogan that worked with Dunne-Cooke .
 Best wishes  Patrick.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on November 12, 2007, 06:51:46 PM
Yes sorry Patrick got my Hogans mixed up.I believe It has been suggested that Dunne Cooke was the inspiration for the Whitefriars knobbly streaky range,i bought my first piece of Whitefriars Dunne Cooke glass fifteen years ago, several glass experts said no thats not Whitefriars,i still have five pieces,. one of them is a large fully signed and numbered bowl.I look forward to the exhibition its well overdue and who better to do it than The Country Seat.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on December 05, 2007, 09:35:57 PM
Will Cort graduated from Stourbridge College and spent 10 years with Webb Corbett finishing as Chief Designer for Royal Doulton Crystal. 1987 became Head of Design at Royal Brierley Crystal (The Glass Cone #14, 1987)

Iestyn Davies. Stourbridge B. A. Glass Course. during that period 'designing three new ranges with Michael Harris for Isle of Wight Glass'. 1985 and 1987 he was employed by Stuart Crystal as resident Coloured Glass Development Artist and designed 5 ranges which were featured at the N.E.C. Craft Fair '86. Set-up Osiris Glass 1987 (The Glass Cone #14, 1987)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on December 06, 2007, 01:32:36 PM
Rachael Woodman designer for Dartington Glass (The Glass Cone #15, 1987)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on December 08, 2007, 03:00:00 PM
William Stanier A.R.C.A. FBII Industrial Art Award. Studied at Stourbridge College of Art, Studied glass design in Sweden. Design several pieces of Stuart Crystal shown at "Britain Can Make It" exhibition.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on January 08, 2008, 12:20:17 AM
Another name...

Adam Aaronson - certainly added to 20th century glass, but who better to decide if he belongs here...  ;)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on January 15, 2008, 01:22:01 PM
Edward Robbins - Pirelli Glass Limited, designed Guinness animals and other Pirelli Glass figures. (1950's)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: David E on January 15, 2008, 01:35:59 PM
It can be told now... ;)

Peter Tysoe: Studio glass artist, but revamped the Chance range in 1970. Designs include Ocean Spray and Gold Spray, Honeysuckle and, most significantly, the alluring Psychedelic pattern. Peter was also responsible for the new shapes and logo, plus Glacier and Grey Dawn ranges.

Robert Barrington: Cannot be confirmed for sure (and it may never be), but was quite probably involved, if not instrumental, in first creating the Chance handkerchief vase and may be the person behind Swirl :clap: Was definitely responsible for the Hellenic design.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on February 01, 2008, 02:06:52 PM
Bermondsey Glass:

Guy Underwood               Pre-war (These boards and my own research)


Now extended to 1930's, if also Bermondsey Glass to be confirmed. see here (http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,18955.0.html)

and Nigels input here (http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,9564.msg82125.html#msg82125)
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on March 03, 2008, 06:38:11 PM
Angus Sillars - Strathearn Glass designer
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on September 10, 2008, 10:16:54 AM
George Walton - James Couper & Sons
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: RetroPerceptive on October 07, 2008, 10:40:52 AM
Michael Harris, I'm currently into a new designer/blower Dominic Fonde who is worth checking out.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on October 16, 2008, 11:25:10 AM
Found some more, ref Design '46 "Britain Can Make It" exhibition.

Walsh Walsh - Harry Trethowan & Agnes Pinder Davies
but could Glyn Farquharson be a misprint?

Stevens & Williams -
Deanne Meanley
Tom Jones

Stuart & Sons Ltd - P Cartwright.

Also included without designer name
Pressed Glass bowls & jug - United Glass Bottle Manufacturers

Independant:
J Lees (Glass figurines)


Mod: Deanne Meanley's name corrected as per Nigel's post below.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: nigel benson on October 23, 2008, 08:30:13 PM
Frank,

There's a typo - should be Deanne Meanley. Mentioned in this thread 6 November 2007 along with Tom Hill.

I agree about the probable misprint Glyn/Clyne that you point out.

Nigel
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: chopin-liszt on December 10, 2008, 03:00:35 PM
 :)

Tim Harris and Elizabeth Harris, Isle of Wight Studio Glass.
Tim also designed for Royal Brierly.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: chopin-liszt on December 10, 2008, 07:23:19 PM

I can's spell Brierley, sorry,  :-[ and forgot to mention  :-[
Elizabeth Harris also designed the Union Flag textiles used for just about everything seen in and around Carnaby Street during the '60s.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: sph@ngw on March 11, 2009, 02:18:15 PM
Thanks for the wonderful response (77) to date! I raised the topic as one of the four rooms is dedicated to British glass designers. I feel it is useful to look in some details work by a person who has spent many years designing glass. I listen to Roger Dodsworth of Broadfield House at the February Cambridge Glass fair lecture he gave, refer to being told about a house in Surrey, ( I think), full of glass designs that would be thrown in the skip if no one was interested! It turned out to be the archives of Alexander hardie Williamson. Sherdley and Ravenhead designer, and thank goodness Roger persuaded the Trustees to take and preserve them.
 The point is, as I see it, there are many Museums with air twist stem, Jacobite goblets, etc galore, but bearing in mind the twentieth century was the most prolific for the British glass industry, which has since almost collapsed. Where are the collections of everyday drinking glasses. I get a thrill in my tiny Museum when someone says "My nan had some of thoses glasses". They are part of ouir history and childhood but ignored by the big Museum like the V&A and Broadfield House, so a collection is needed!

Keep on suggesting the names of british designers. the fact there are so many, and so many neglected says a lot about our culture and heritage as a nation! 
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on April 02, 2012, 05:05:18 PM
Has anyone mentioned Catherine Hough . just google her you will see what i am saying .jp
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on April 06, 2013, 09:33:58 PM
Anthony Stern .
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: Frank on April 08, 2013, 12:00:54 AM
 good artist, but designer?
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: johnphilip on April 08, 2013, 08:19:39 AM
Surely Artist Designer . ???
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: mhgcgolfclub on September 15, 2016, 11:42:09 AM
Roys wife posting here <waves>, hope this doesn't appear rude, but why would you exclude vases and perfume bottles from an exhibition of glass? domestic means the home and people do still have vases in their homes and show me one female who doesnt have a perfume bottle for display even if empty, even my daughter who has zero interest in glass hankers after a nice iridescent atomiser from times past.
You cant exclude items on the basis they are no longer used otherwise you may as well exclude other clutter people very rarely use nowadays such as decanting anything into pots such as mint, mustard, marmalade, butter dishes, match strikers,  etc, so many people do not bother.

If I was visiting a museum with my other half or the family, I would not go somewhere just to view tableware/functional/industrial design,  that is a man thing only imo and far too lofty. Being of a creative & artistic bent myself I would want to view the decorative too, cant there be a mixture of the two?
Not my museum of course, just my opinion.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: David E on September 15, 2016, 11:57:26 AM
Hello Roy's wife <waves back>.

Industrial design is something I am very keen on, but I wouldn't agree it's just a "man thing"  :D

I proposed the designed Robert Goodden, whose 1934 Spiderweb design of fruit bowls, dishes, plates, celeries, parfaits, grapefruits, et al, really stood the test of time and was only dropped by Chance Brothers in the mid-1950s: a span of nearly 20 years. But I am also very keen on collecting 20th-century art glass and the majority of answers here are putting forwards artists and designers from this period.

Broadfield House Glass Museum contained an excellent mix of both although, understandably, the emphasis was on the superior end of the market, in particular Stourbridge glass. I'm all for the eclectic mix of all forms of glass and glassware: it's what made Britain.
Title: Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
Post by: SaraCampbell on June 02, 2017, 07:27:41 AM
Over the previous twenty years approximately a greater understanding has actually grown of the job of 20th century British glass manufacturers and designers. A great deal was achieved by the significant and also influential event "British Glass In between the Wars" held at Broadfield House Glass Gallery in 1987, which recognised work by Monart, Gray-Stan, James Stuart flower holder with decor made by Graham Sutherland. Stuart flower holder with decoration designed by Graham Sutherland (Circa 1934) Powell, Stuart & Sons, Thomas Webb, Webb Corbett and Stevens & Williams (Royal Brierley) as well as developers such as Keith Murray and Clyne Farquharson. Currently, the brochure modified by Roger Dodsworth for this program is still considered as one of one of the most insightful books available on the subject.

https://www.sheerglass.com/