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Glass Discussion & Research. No ID requests here please. => British & Irish Glass => Topic started by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 01:25:44 PM

Title: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 01:25:44 PM
I was lucky enough to find this on Sunday.

It's signed: "Samuel Herman 1967 London 107"  :thud:
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A Treasure from the National.
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 01:27:57 PM
 :ooh:
No apologies at all for a lot of images - there is so much going on in it you need loads of views!
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A Treasure from the National.
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 01:29:44 PM
 :)
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A Treasure from the National.
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 01:30:55 PM
last two  ;D
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Greg. on November 17, 2011, 01:50:43 PM
Sue's seen a few pictures of these before, seems a fitting place for them to be included. (These are the only pictures I have at hand at present)

All were blown at the RCA in the late 60s.

Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Greg. on November 17, 2011, 01:51:39 PM
And last but no means least.........
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 01:58:20 PM
 :thud: again! Gorgeous - my favourite is the reddy bottle with the ball-top.
(But I'm not swapping any for my new bit, Greg - sorry!). I'll get pics of my other bits, but they're not RCA origins as yours are and they don't have as much going on in them as my new bit.
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: flying free on November 17, 2011, 03:26:30 PM
Stoooopp :ooh:
I can't look anymore  :mrgreen:  :mrgreen:  :mrgreen:
Sue I just love the colours, the strapping, the shape, the, the...everything about it.
Greg the red one is fantastic!
m
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 03:57:08 PM
Leni's hubby hated it aesthetically - but got very excited (as I am too!) about all the physics and chemistry and mechanics of it.
It's awash with colours - reds, blues, browns, ochres, greens, purples - it's got every effect of silver chloride salts imaginable - and it's got effects from the use of tin as well - they're the grey-ish-black-ish matt-ish metal spots.

It does have a big burst bubble in it - but thankfully, it's not in a place where it detracts in any way from the thing.
(It just made it slightly less unaffordable, for which I am grateful.)
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Leni on November 17, 2011, 04:31:50 PM
It's lovely, lovely, lovely!  I'm so happy for you!  :girlcheer:  :kissy: 

Can you tell everyone the story of the background to this, and why it is so important in the history of Studio Glass, please Sue  :thup:
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 17, 2011, 05:14:58 PM
well, it's very nearly its 44th birthday around now. I've got Mark's book out to make sure I get my dates and info. correct. I'm quoting a lot here - but not word for word, mostly pps 12-15, and much abrieviated.
"Michael Harris; Mdina Glass and Isle of Wight Studio Glass"

Effectively, the Studio Glass Movement was born in America of what came to be known as "The Toledo Seminars", between Harvey Littleton (a ceramicist who built a small furnace and wanted to try melting glass to work with at low temperatures) and Dominic Labino, (who attended the first seminar and had the idea of melting the kind of glass used for making marbles - which worked - Littleton's first experiments didn't work well.) and by 1963, Littleton was teaching these new techniques at an offshoot of the University of Wisconsin.
One of his students was Sam Herman, who won a Fulbright Scolarship to study cold-working techniques in Edinburgh in '65 - where he met Helen Munro-Turner (A wonderful bit of serendipity!).
With her support, he organised an exhibition of the new "studio" style work, and a small, (but short-lived) furnace was also built there in Edinburgh. Lord Queensbury (Professor at the RCA) saw the exhibition - and he was enthralled.
He invited Sam to London to become a Research Fellow in the glass departnment.
So, in Autumn '66, Sam arrived in London and two small "tank" furnaces were built.

Michael Harris was, at the time, a tutor in industrial glass at the RCA, but had had some experience with hot glass during his travels abroad and was desperately keen to get going in this sort of direction - Sam's presence, his lecture and his teaching of working with hot glass were just what Michael Harris needed.

It was shortly after this that Michael Harris resigned from the RCA, upped sticks and went off to Malta in December '67, to found Mdina, and Sam Herman took over at the RCA and went on to start the Glasshouse.

So, this piece I now hold in custody for posterity was made at the RCA at that very time!

The birth of the British Studio Glass Movement.

Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Frank on November 17, 2011, 10:25:15 PM
Lovely to have such a wonderful piece of history Sue! Mind you I cannot say it is my cup of tea but can certainly appreciate it. Sort of fits in with Mdina too. And NATIONAL TREASURE it certainly is too! Hope it finds a good home up in a museum up there one day.

I prefer some of Greg's but I guess they are equally important if made at the same time. You don't mention how yours are signed Greg.
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Greg. on November 18, 2011, 06:22:09 PM
Frank - Here's a brief description of how each piece is signed, I should mention that these pieces came from my late father, who used to teach in the industrial school at the RCA in the 60s and 70s. All would date from the late 60s which Sam kindly confirmed a few years ago.

The first piece is signed Samuel J Herman and has a four digit number/letter code which is hard to mark out.
The second piece is signed Samuel J Herman 1969 RCA London, and also has a personal inscription to my father, which makes this piece all the more special to me.
The third piece, I can't seem to find a signature on, although Sam thinks it is signed somewhere, however would date to around 68.
The piece in the last photo is signed Samuel J Herman 1968 RCA London

Hope this helps.

Greg




Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Frank on November 18, 2011, 10:25:36 PM
Cool - so a thread full of Museum pieces. Probably with the highest total value of almost any thread on the board!
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: MHJ02 on November 29, 2011, 12:10:59 PM
On my recent visit to the UK, I went to the Glass Fair with a friend, a fellow Monart collector, who started to talk enthusiastically about Sam Herman.   Being a little deaf (well that's my excuse) I  had to ask him to repeat the name several times as I've never heard of him.   This lead me to look him up on the net to see exactly what he made and why he is now collectable.   

I then logged on here and found Sue's excellent informative piece on Sam.   If he is a national treasure, presumably his pieces are highly collectable.   Not that I'm intending to start collecting Sam's work, but out curiousity what sort of prices does his pieces achieve.


Many thanks
Mary
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 29, 2011, 12:37:06 PM
The title of this thread is a play on words - I bought the piece at the recent "National" fair and it is my treasure - but I do think the double meaning is completely appropriate. :smg:

I also think Frank's comment might be a bit off-track  :thud: - given there is a member here who collects claret jugs which are in price echelons unthinkable by most folk - just one of those jugs would buy you perhaps 15 substantially important pieces by Sam!

I believe Sam's current work is priced at around £700 - £1,000+

The secondary market, as I'm sure you know, is variable and dependant on loads of factors.
If you want to get a decent overview of the secondary market, try watching pieces on ebay to see what they go for.
 
Obviously, prices at Fairs are different to ebay - it's a completely different set of circumstances.

The sellers have to make their margin and take into account the trouble, time, knowledge, expertise and considerable expense they put in to finding such treasures, obtaining them and then setting themselves up at the fair - which includes travelling, time, petrol and the cost of their stand.

Was it the National in Birmingham you went to, Mary? :)

Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: MHJ02 on November 29, 2011, 04:47:24 PM
Yes Sue, it was the Glass Fair at the Nat. M/C Museum.    What I like about the glass fair is the opportunity to look at all the different types of glass, especially some of the modern glass, I never thought I would sercombe to modern glass.   I met Alan at the fair for the first time and saw his glass and some of it is very, very nice indeed.

My horizons have been opened now knowing about Sam Herman

Thank you Sue  :hiclp:

Mary

Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Patrick on November 29, 2011, 04:48:36 PM
Some of his work here.......... http://www.zestgallery.com/artists.php?display=4

and this.......... http://www.zestgallery.com/artists.php?action=bio&display=4
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 29, 2011, 06:06:31 PM
I've got a couple of other early bits I need to photograph to put here too. They all went out of focus and wonky when I tried before.
I'm delighted to have helped introduce you to the joys of modern and contemporary glass, Mary!
However, if you started on Monart, you clearly have good taste in hot-worked glass, it can't have been too hard to get your juices flowing! :thup:

ummmm - which Alan? I got a bit...... sidetracked after gettting my Sam bit, which ate my budget, but I did manage to find Allister Malcolm - never a man to miss!
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Frank on November 29, 2011, 06:44:01 PM
I also think Frank's comment might be a bit off-track  :thud:

Often are  :) but I don't let that stop me. Of course British Studio Glass is horribly undervalued. Dresser's Clutha does very well of course and Ysart glass had its hey-day too!

Migrating from Monart to Studio glass is a small step Mary - essentially it is the same thing separated by a 'movement' and its definition. It was interesting in Edinburgh that Nigel's talk dealt with defining Monart as early studio glass... as too in the US there are many contenders for 'early' studio glass there. Perth auctioneers have also invented the term Vasart (and Monart) Studio glass - intended to imply a superior part of the production and encourage higher bids, but misleading nonetheless.
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: MHJ02 on November 29, 2011, 07:31:43 PM
I've just loooked at the 2 web pages - wow, I liked this one and that one and that one too - in fact there wasn't one I didn't like!!!!    Just wish my pocket was large as well ;D ;D

It's not Alan but Adam A, I think - I'm a complete nerd where names are concerned, the little grey cells seem to have dropped off!!!    And some of the glass at the Glass Fair was Adam's!!   Someone put me out my misery.!!!!!!!

 Mary

Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: chopin-liszt on November 30, 2011, 11:49:40 AM
 :clap:
Adam makes more sense than an Alan, Mary - and yes, his work is really lovely and absolutely fascinating! 
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Fuhrman Glass on November 30, 2011, 11:32:16 PM
I just got my brochure for the 50th Glass Arts Society conference in Toledo Ohio in June and noticed Sam Herman is mentioned as one of the participants in a panel discussion on "World Influences". Lucio Bubacco, Bertil valien and others are on the same panel.
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: flying free on March 27, 2012, 08:54:24 PM
Tom, I just saw your post on the Labino thread and remembered you saying you had this conference brochure.  Are you going?  Is there a 'buzz' around studio glass in the States at the moment given the anniversary this year?

m
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Fuhrman Glass on March 27, 2012, 09:17:43 PM
Yes, I'm going have all my reservations made including a tour of Pilkington Float glass plant and a tour of Libbey's plant.
There appears to be a lot of the old timers that are going to be there so I'm going. Even a bunch of the oldtimers doing demos one night, Fritz Dreaisbach, Henry Halem, Audrey Handler, Peiser, Lipofsky, Michael Taylor and others. Others giving lectures, etc. are Paul Stankard, Herb babcock, Hank Adams, Klaus Moje, Jack Schmidt, Bertil valien, Richard Marquis, Mark mathews, Luci Bubacco, and many others. Toots Zinsky, Carlie parriott, Joel Philip Myers, Sam herman, Ruth King will be involved in some panel discussions.
I doubt that many of these will be seen at anything like this again. We're all getting old. They have advised that some seating for some events may be limited though. First come, first served basis. 
Are you going?
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: flying free on March 27, 2012, 10:19:55 PM
oh ... I would 'love' to be going but unfortunately that will never happen  ;D - I'm in the UK and a visit to the States is unlikely in the foreseeable future lol.  But I would love to hear feedback on the event though if you have time to report in afterwards.
Have a great time.  I recognise some of the names you mention but many others, not...so now I have something else to research and hopefully more wonderful glass to see  :)
Thanks
m
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Fuhrman Glass on March 28, 2012, 01:40:40 AM
Before I get to the GAS conference in June, I'll be coming to the UK about May 3. Taking a boat from Miami (celebrity Eclipse) that ends up at Southhampton that has a hot glass studio on it. The we have tickets to see The Wizard of Oz in London and then on to see friends up near Milton Keynes. Passing up the glass locales this time. Was over to see all the stuff around STOURBRIDGE and the Broadfield House again a few years ago. I was to the Glasshouse back in the mid 70's. If I can afford it anyone can. Remember I'm just a starving old glassblower. Selling off much of the old glass collection to make the most of travel while I still can.
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Bernard C on March 28, 2012, 06:34:17 AM
Tom Note that the twice yearly National Glass Fair (http://www.glassfairs.co.uk/) is on Sunday May 6 in Birmingham.   It would be a shame to miss this world class event and you would be made most welcome.

As you are staying near Milton Keynes, two other items.

1. If you visit Stony Stratford, don't miss the Cock Hotel, the world's most famous coaching inn, and source of "A Cock and Bull Story" and, possibly, "Ride a Cock Horse".   Great bar snacks.   While you are there, please take a look at the lampshades in reception.   I would very much like to know how they were made.

2. I live about 200 yards from the Cock Hotel in Stony Stratford, and would be delighted to welcome you and show you around.   I can't show you much in the way of studio glass at home as I deal in vintage British factory glass, but it's here if you want to see any.

Bernard C.  8)
Title: Re: Sam Herman:- A National Treasure
Post by: Fuhrman Glass on March 28, 2012, 02:56:06 PM
Bernard: thanks for the info and invite. I mentioned it to my wife and she says she knows the "Cock & Bull" She worked in Milton Keynes in the mid 70's for about 3 years. She was an asst. architect on the city center project. We will be staying a couple of nights with friends in Wolverton May 5&6. She lived in numerous places around the area while she worked there. Send me a PM with your phone # and we can ring you up when we get there and maybe find a convenient time to meet up. my e-mail is (removed to prevent spam harvesting) or my website is www.fuhrmanglass.com and it has all my info.
Tom

Mod: Tom, I've removed your email address from your post so it won't be harvested by spam bots. You have the option enabled for folks to email you via the board here (by clicking the wee envelope icon below your name), so Bernard can reach you that way.   8)