Glass Message Board

Glass Identification - Post here for all ID requests => Glass Paperweights => Topic started by: Nick77 on November 02, 2012, 03:52:27 PM

Title: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 02, 2012, 03:52:27 PM
Just got this back from repolishing, from chipped bruised and covered in dirt engrained scratches to pristine, well worth it I think

Nick
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: pooleandpaperweights on November 02, 2012, 05:08:20 PM
Mind me asking who did it and how much?
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 02, 2012, 05:14:18 PM
Sorry I couldn't possibly say :P



Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 02, 2012, 05:18:14 PM
Oh Ok,
It was Richard Lamming at Redhouse Glass Crafts at The Ruskin Glass Centre in Stourbridge, it was 14.
 This was in a batch of 5 items ranging from a small chip in a glass vase rim at 3 to a very scratched old English inkwell at 23.
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: pooleandpaperweights on November 02, 2012, 05:36:18 PM
14 is a bargain.  Is that your antique baccarat like the one I brought this week?
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: flying free on November 02, 2012, 06:26:49 PM
Can I ask a question?  did you measure it with calipers before it left and if so, how much smaller is it now please?  I'm always curious to know what a difference repolishing makes to the size.
Obviously I know it depends on whether or not any bruises are being attempted to be polished out as well, but I'm talking about just surface damage.
m
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 02, 2012, 07:00:27 PM
14 is a bargain.  Is that your antique baccarat like the one I brought this week?
Yes it's the same one, it was away being re polished at the time.


Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: pooleandpaperweights on November 02, 2012, 07:01:23 PM
Did they take any bruises out?  or just a surface polish?
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 02, 2012, 07:11:45 PM
Can I ask a question?  did you measure it with calipers before it left and if so, how much smaller is it now please?  I'm always curious to know what a difference repolishing makes to the size.
Obviously I know it depends on whether or not any bruises are being attempted to be polished out as well, but I'm talking about just surface damage.
m
I did actually, I took it to Richard in person to discuss it with him, it had 2 chips to the very base edge and a bruise also starting at the base and about 4mm in diameter but not too deep.

 I explained that I was worried about losing too much glass from such a small weight (40mm diam) so to leave the chips and bruise as they were low down and just polish out the surface scratches.

When I collected it he had in fact removed the chips and the bruise as can be seen. As he explained until you actually start to re polish it is difficult to know how much would be needed to be removed and in this case found they were not too deep and he felt it was worth removing them all.

I'm glad he'd did, it has lost about 3mm from the bottom and no more than 1 -1.5 mm over the majority of the dome with perhaps 2mm from the very bottom chamfer back to the base.

I suppose that had the chips and bruise been left I would have been left with a superficially attractive weight but still with damage that would undoubtably have affected its value as opposed to the pretty near perfect weight I have now.
I guess his 25 years experience shows.
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 02, 2012, 07:13:44 PM
Did they take any bruises out?  or just a surface polish?

Crossed posts here see the reply above.

It's also worth noting I sent photos for a quote in the first instance and was quoted 25 without seeing the paperweight first hand, so was very pleased at the final price.
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: keith on November 03, 2012, 01:10:52 AM
When I was at the Ruskin centre earlier in the year for the glass festival I bought a glass bottleneck from a glass restorer,would this have been him,can't remember his name he gave me a card and I lost it ::) ::)
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 03, 2012, 02:28:02 PM
When I was at the Ruskin centre earlier in the year for the glass festival I bought a glass bottleneck from a glass restorer,would this have been him,can't remember his name he gave me a card and I lost it ::) ::)

Yes that's him, there were posters up for them.
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: oldglassman on November 03, 2012, 03:08:16 PM
HI ,
         First let me say that my knowledge of paperweights is -0,  however I am intrigued by this comment ,
 
"I suppose that had the chips and bruise been left I would have been left with a superficially attractive weight but still with damage that would undoubtably have affected its value as opposed to the pretty near perfect weight I have now."

Does this mean that in the paperweight world a restored item that is regarded as 'pretty near perfect' would not have an affect on its value ?

In my world of drinking glasses any restoration at all affects an items value especially if glass has been removed and the original proportions have been lost.

Just curious,

cheers ,
               Peter.
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: Nick77 on November 03, 2012, 04:03:44 PM
As long as too much glass has not been removed, bearing in mind that they can vary in size and layout of canes from piece to piece of the same design any way.
 As I said earlier I thought that too much glass would have been necessary to be removed to eradicate the chips and bruise so had requested they be left as I thought it's value would have been too compromised. The restorer then found he could effect their removal without losing too much glass and did so.

I certainly find that items with damage affect resale values quite markedly.

Nick
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: keith on November 03, 2012, 04:08:44 PM
Nick,thanks for the reply,had a chat and he seemed like a nice bloke ;D ;D
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: flying free on November 03, 2012, 05:29:28 PM
Peter, I've been pondering this. 
I have a question in return though please.  In your world of (18c and earlier? please correct me if I'm wrong) drinking glasses for example, would damage affect an item more in terms of sale price, than a repair would do?

I suppose though for paperweights for example, as long as any restoration is mentioned in resale, then the history of the piece is complete and the buyer can make their own mind up on whether or not to buya restored item, and at what price.
m
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: oldglassman on November 03, 2012, 05:49:06 PM
HI,
       I don't find it alters the value of an item whether it is sold damaged or after restoration they are both not perfect examples, a restored glass may be easier to sell as the 'damage is no longer instantly visible and you are not reminded( for example) that the bowl has a chip when you lift it up , I don't think that restoration,if declared,increases the glasses value though, as you said the trouble comes when restorations are not declared and subsequent owners believe what they have is a perfect example.

cheers ,
            Peter.
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: flying free on November 03, 2012, 06:01:58 PM
thanks  :)
Having looked at past topics on repairs/restoration on glass, this is a much debated topic it seems.
m
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: KevinH on November 05, 2012, 02:47:44 AM
One point about restoration of paperweights is that if a domed weight is reground and polished then the profile can be altered such that a significant visual degradation results.

This usually means that design elements at the outer edge, especially millefiori canes, can be, at least partially, lost to sight (sometimes referred to as "falling off"). Where a weight has had a partial repair to the dome, rather than a full regrind, then the design elements can be off-centre when viewed through the top of the dome.

Another problem is where a domed weight has been restored to the top or side of the dome only, resulting in a "flat spot". That type of repair can cause a reduction in the magnification of the design at the area of the the repair.

Any repair that causes an obvious distortion to the internal design or pattern can give rise to a serious reduction in monetary value.

However, where a repair has simply been a light grinding and repolishing of the whole dome in order to remove surface scratches, the result is usually an improvement in the visual appearance of the weight. In such cases, the monetary value, compared to that of a perfect, original example, will not be greatly affected.

Many antique French weights (which have developed a cult status amongst some collectors) have been reground and repolished at some stage in their history but are still desirable to lots of people and therefore command sale prices not too far below the "price for perfection".

For myself, focussing on Ysart weights, I have only had one item repolished and that was because of heavy scuffing and scratching to the dome. I bought at auction it before I had even heard of the name Ysart. Nobody in the room wanted the scruffy looking concentric item and in reaction to the auctioneer's rather forceful tone, I raised my hand. It was mine for 20. In its repolished state, and with its proper attribution, I am sure that somebody on eBay would now be happy to pay at least 200 for it. :)
Title: Re: What a difference a re-polish makes
Post by: tropdevin on November 05, 2012, 08:30:19 AM
***

I agree with Kevin ( :o ) about the potential problems of changes to the profile, and canes 'vanishing  over the edge' (though I disagree about which paperweights have undeserved cult status... ;D).  I think the profile changes are more of a problem with lead crystal paperweights, due to the higher refractive index of the glass. It is quite common to find Clichy or Baccarat weights where some of the outer canes are invisible from a direct top view. I suspect this is usually due to repolishing, but I have seen one or two like that where the dome still had 'blocking' marks, and so was original. 

The 'flat top' is a problem with some weights that have been restored badly - and from time to time I come across weights that are covered with lots of tiny polished flats, so you feel you are looking into swirling water - another form of incompetent restoration.  However, I have seen plenty of weights with a flat or even slightly depressed top that were clearly made that way!

Alan