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1
Thank you both.
I apologize for the profile picture, it is an optical illusion and the glass is clear.

I am familiar with Mosser's work and I've always figured that the images in his weights were always achieved by using some sort of mechanical printing process thus achieving great detail and definition.  The image in this piece has some detail but still far less then those seen in Mosser's work. However I do believe that this piece was at least partially created by an appliqué process yet it shows signs of being partially hand colored. Possibly a two step process, where first the black outlines were applied then colored in by hand. This piece also differs in that the image is applied directly to the glass without encasement to the shallow concavity of the base.
2
Glass / Canary yellow individual open salt - Joseph Webb or American?
« Last post by Anne E.B. on Today at 08:03:12 PM »
The more I try to find out about this little 8 sided salt, the more confused I get ::)  It's a fab colour and doesn't need a U.V. light to glow as shown.  I would imagine its an individual salt as its only 2¼ x 1¾ x ¾ inches, has what I'd desribe as a square pyramid with a flat square hobnail pattern.

I think it could possibly be one made by Joseph Webb, no. 4775 seen here in their 1870 catalogue http://opensalts.us/References/Catalogs/England/ENG-Webb1870-aW.jpg (taken from here http://opensalts.us/opensaltsus.html ) although the image is not very clear.

I then discovered that Webb Jr. went to work at Phoenix Glass Works Ohio c.1883, and that they produced Canary Flint or Canary Yellow pieces, so it could have been made there, although I'm inclined to think more near to home, being in the U.K.

Just to confuse things even more, for me at least, other glassworks made similar ones including George Duncan & Sons, which can be seen on the opensalts website in the U.S. section no.308, and also here page 5 no.7. http://opensalts.us/References/SaltyComments/SC20.pdf and  last but not least U.S. Glass Company's catalogue, which George Duncan became part of.

At this point, I'm getting exhausted ;D

The two identical pattern flint ones were just acquired very recently, as I thought they might help in the search. 
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British & Irish Glass / Re: A bit of showing off
« Last post by glassobsessed on Today at 07:47:24 PM »
It looks like a dichroic effect.
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British & Irish Glass / Re: A bit of showing off
« Last post by flying free on Today at 07:46:21 PM »
 ;D  Thanks Sue - I had a 'warning someone else has posted' just as I was about to post it.
I've not time to read it all again at the mo, but I did think (could very well be wrong though) that Christine discovered there was some chocolate on her glasses when looking into the rim?  Did I 'think' wrong?
m
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Glass Market Place / Re: Glasgow plate heirloom lost...
« Last post by chopin-liszt on Today at 07:40:14 PM »
I only see them on the bottom shelves on charity shops gathering dust, because they don't sell at £1.99.

Is that what they're offering for one? I didn't read anything about money. Just looked at the plate. And I most certainly wouldn't expect any profit for just helping somebody out. :)
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British & Irish Glass / Re: A bit of showing off
« Last post by chopin-liszt on Today at 07:36:58 PM »
Is it written down anywhere, Frank - or was that just his personal interpretation because some did get overstruck, or did he have "insider knowledge"?

Haveing seen and held and examined Christine's goblets, where the brown is absent, they look completely right. Brown just doesn't go with the other colours.
(mind you, I don't think "brown" goes with anything  ;) )

I don't know of any "Alexandrite" made by other makers - unless it's neodynium. I thought this tri/quaternary colour heat struck thing was purely "Webb's Alexandrite", "Alexandrite" being the name they specifically gave to this range.
Kind of like the names given to colours by wfs, so you know where you are with "wfs kingfisher", but it would be wrong to describe all turquoises, particularly those from other makers, as "kingfisher".

I'm still not sure if we are yet sure whether the brown is supposed to be there or not. ;D

I speculated not, because it does absolutely nothing to improve it.

This is the big thread where the other discussion got going. It was a bit OT to the OP's post.
How do I tell M to stop looking for it?

http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,56652.0.html

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British & Irish Glass / Re: A bit of showing off
« Last post by flying free on Today at 07:33:11 PM »
'Puzzled on comments above re the chocolate-brown colour seen when viewed on edge. I handled all of Parkington's Alexandrite and his impostor examples, he told me the effect was what defined the Webb version.'

I also understood this to be a defining factor as to whether or not a piece was a Webb's Alexandrite piece.  There is another recent thread where this effect/factor is discussed in quite a lot of detail.
I'll try and find it and link it to this one.

m
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Glass Paperweights / This might be inwrong place.
« Last post by BobKegeles on Today at 07:23:52 PM »
Two questions.

1) Can the "Glass Message Board" be considered a non-profit/charity, and therefore register with eBay under their "sell for a cause" program? This would allow me to automatically send a small percentage of each item I sell (that I've gotten help on especially), to the GMB. I know there are the "sell through" links on the site that would give GMB a small payback, but those won't work for me since I post through a third party system (Auctivia).

2) Can anyone recommend a good online resource with photos, that can help me understand and differentiate Italian, and/or glass elements?

When I look at definitions I have trouble understanding the differences between murine and cane and millefiori.

Between latticino vs. reticello vs. zanfirico etc.

Is a twisted ribbon a cane? or simply a twisted ribbon. Is a linear stretch/line of translucent color (like what you see in latticino plates and vases) a ribbon, even though it has no distinct edging or depth? 

I see the term "lacy filligrana" yet cannot figure out when it applies.

Is a cane that is a hollow tube (often hollow with a white interior surface and a bright color exterior casing) considered a cane?, or is it simply a "tube"?

It would be lovely if there were a pictorial glossary. Perhaps even a "blown schematic" like you see with machinery, or Ikea furniture instructions, LOL.

For that matter, if calling something bullicante, do I say a paperweight has a "bullicante" or a "bullicante pattern"? As an example, a classic Gentile piece is the "goose in flight" that floats over controlled bubbles, so I can't simply say it's a bullicante paperweight, do I say the goose is floating over a bullicante, or a bullicante pattern, or maybe even a bullicante element or effect.

I'm really trying very hard to not come across as stupid as I actually am, LOL.

Bob
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I would be delighted if anyone knows who made this cut and machine-trailed vase with an incidental wasp or bee next to fern fronds and wildflowers?  It seems to be a quality item.  It is 13.5cm high (5 1/4 inches) with a 5cm (2 inch) base and rim.
It has a ground pontil mark on a shallow foot.
Thank you.
Ian
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British & Irish Glass / Re: A bit of showing off
« Last post by Frank on Today at 07:13:17 PM »
Puzzled on comments above re the chocolate-brown colour seen when viewed on edge. I handled all of Parkington's Alexandrite and his impostor examples, he told me the effect was what defined the Webb version.
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