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31
I would say it was a completely different shade of green: a lot of companies made uranium jade green glass
Plus when you look at most Sandwich glass you can plainly see a very strong European influence...both French & Bohemian, but I think this one is a bit more sophisticated European in design.
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Glass / Re: Murano I Think - But Which Maker?
« Last post by David E on December 16, 2014, 03:34:57 PM »
I have three pieces in Cordonata d'Ora - clear, pink and ruby.
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Stourbridge threaded small jug
« Last post by David E on December 16, 2014, 03:26:27 PM »
That is an interesting thought - how was the threading done right to the lip? I assume it was threaded to a flat, horizontal rim and the shape of the rim formed afterwards. Can you provide a close-up of the rim, Robert?
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Stourbridge threaded small jug
« Last post by Paul S. on December 16, 2014, 02:56:26 PM »
yes, assumed so  -   presumably not a lot unlike the Krys-Tol/Jefferson u. custard glass, although perhaps that was more yellow - yours look paler, so perhaps less u.

I don't see in any of the books specific reference to these small creamers doubling up as water jugs for whiskey - maybe just one of those unintended uses when it was found that they were either cheaper or more readily available.
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Great, thanks for organising the photos Rosie, much better than a link that becomes useless after a month or three.
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Late 19th century amber glass vase - ID = Jobling
« Last post by keith on December 16, 2014, 01:21:02 PM »
I use a hard piece of sharp plastic, works well without any scratching to the glass, ;D
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Stourbridge threaded small jug
« Last post by Lustrousstone on December 16, 2014, 12:49:46 PM »
Mine, as shown, are glass
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British & Irish Glass / Re: Stourbridge threaded small jug
« Last post by Paul S. on December 16, 2014, 12:37:22 PM »
the other feature of this piece that I thought was unusual - but could just be me being dim - was where the threading continues to the very peak of the lip.                   Threading, I thought, usually encircles the whole of an object, not something that is only half there as with much of this pouring lip.

Threading is added to a piece, I'd assumed, after the shape has been formed, so adding threading to a piece with a lip of this profile must present other difficulties, especially if produced on a machine. :-\

Would be interesting to hear if someone knows for how long machine threading continued into the C20.

I did think of water jugs for whiskey, but no idea how this was done in the C19  -  maybe ceramic jugs were used for that purpose instead of glass.     
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Glass Paperweights / Re: getting bruises removed?
« Last post by chriscooper on December 16, 2014, 11:41:27 AM »
Richard is here.....http://ruskinglasscentre.co.uk/tennants/redhouse-glass-crafts/

The weight he did for my friend had a small bullseye bruise and scratches came back perfect from Richard and only cost 20
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I would like to thank the seller for giving me permission to share her photos with you for permanent reference,  so here they are:

Mod: For completeness, the images are from eBay seller "aunthettie"
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