Looking for Glass on ebay? Angela's Designer Searches can help! Click here!

Author Topic: Lord's Last Supper Plate  (Read 2880 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TerriR

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 9
  • Gender: Female
Lord's Last Supper Plate
« on: March 14, 2009, 02:20:53 PM »
I have been trying to identify a plate that was my great, great, great Grandmother's.  The plate is approximately 200 years old. It is a clear 11x7 plate with the Lord's Last Supper on it.  I see no markings on this plate. I thought it might be Tiara glass, but I know that company only dates back to about 1896. Anyone with any information would be of great help.  Thanks!


Offline Ron

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 94
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2009, 02:53:24 PM »
It will be difficult to ID without a picture. BTW, Tiara started around 1970 in the US.


Offline TerriR

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 9
  • Gender: Female
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2009, 05:42:55 PM »
Thanks for the response. I hope the pic comes thru okay.

Moderator: Copyright image removed


Offline Bernard C

  • Committee
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3157
  • Milton Keynes based British glass dealer
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2009, 06:03:39 PM »
TR — Welcome to the GMB.

There is thought to have been a large Last Supper platter made by Sowerby.   Feel all over the upper surface, and you might find their trademark, a peacock's head over a twisted rope.   Sowerby exported worldwide, so one could turn up anywhere.

... and beware of rock solid family history.   Family histories can be great works of fiction, particularly when "shameful" events like illegitimacy, prostitution, conscientious objectors, criminals, mental illness and other disabilities have had to be excluded.   There are few family histories that haven't been improved in some way!   ;D

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline TxSilver

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2811
  • Gender: Female
    • San Marcos Art Glass
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2009, 06:06:36 PM »
The Model Flint Glass Co. of Findlay, Ohio, USA, first presented the Lord's Supper bread plate in 1891 -- not 200 years, but it is the earliest I know of. This information is from Measell and Smith's Findlay Glass. I do not know which colors were made, but if you know your plate is this old, then it is most likely Findlay glass. Measell and Smith write that the mould for the plate was made by Henry Coons in 1890 and there was excitement because it was an original and not a copy of an earlier work.
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
Visit the Murano Zoo
http://sites.google.com/site/muranozoo/


Offline TxSilver

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2811
  • Gender: Female
    • San Marcos Art Glass
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2009, 06:13:39 PM »
BTW, Tiara Glass was a 20th Century glass distribution company. Tiara glass was sold using a Tupperware-party type model, if I understand correctly. Women would have Tiara glass parties and sell glass to their friends. Much of the glass was made by Indiana Glass, so you can find patterns listed both as Tiara and Indiana. I believe Tiara Glass was in operation for about 20 years (1970-80s). Members, please feel free to correct me if my dates are off. Tiara Glass sold Lord's Supper plates, but the quality was not as good as the original Findlay work.
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
Visit the Murano Zoo
http://sites.google.com/site/muranozoo/


Offline Bernard C

  • Committee
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3157
  • Milton Keynes based British glass dealer
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2009, 06:30:01 PM »
TR — Your picture shows the general type that regularly turns up in Britain in two sizes, a small one that could be 11cm x 7cm that is unmarked, and is often attributed to Sowerby, and a much larger platter, that could be 11" x 7", that is much more scarce, and might carry the Sowerby TM.   If they are Sowerby, that colour dates from the introduction of their Tynesyde glass in the late 1920s at the earliest.

If you are certain about your family tradition, then the simplest explanation is a replacement for a broken piece.

Religious artifacts are difficult, generally unmarked, and rarely appearing in trade catalogues as they were sold in bulk to religious wholesalers.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline TerriR

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 9
  • Gender: Female
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2009, 08:21:37 PM »
Thanks to everyone for the wealth of information!  I will do some more research.  I didn't see any trademark etc, but I'll investigate further!
My plate is 11x7 so it is the larger of the plates.  My mother gave me the family history. She is still alive & 78 years old. She was 30 when she got
it from her Grandmother, who died when she was 100.  I am still researching how old my great great grandmother was when she got it from my great great
grandmother.


Offline pamela

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2365
  • Gender: Female
    • Pressed Glass 1840-1950
    • Hamburg, Germany
    • http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2009, 09:26:22 PM »
Hi Terri, welcome to the board!
In order to identify just the pattern I have dared to attribute mine like this:
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de/tafelaufsaetze/02795.html
but it bears a huge ?
Good luck!
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


Offline TxSilver

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2811
  • Gender: Female
    • San Marcos Art Glass
Re: Lord's Last Supper Plate
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2009, 09:37:25 PM »
TR — Your picture shows the general type that regularly turns up in Britain in two sizes, a small one that could be 11cm x 7cm that is unmarked, and is often attributed to Sowerby, and a much larger platter, that could be 11" x 7", that is much more scarce, and might carry the Sowerby TM.   ...
Bernard C.  8)

Bernard, I wonder if Sowerby used the same moulds that Model Flint used. It would be nice to compare the different plates side by side. I was able to compare a Model Flint version to a Tiara Glass version. There was no comparison in the quality. The timing of production (Flint to Sowerby) made me wonder if Sowerby might have purchased the moulds or copied them.
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
Visit the Murano Zoo
http://sites.google.com/site/muranozoo/

 

Search
eBay.com
eBay.co.uk

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum
Enter
key words
to search
Amazon.com