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Author Topic: Pressed frosted custard cup  (Read 692 times)

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Offline neilh

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Pressed frosted custard cup
« on: July 07, 2018, 06:45:47 AM »
I found this one recently. Although there is no lozenge, it almost certainly has to be Molineaux Webb as it combines two of their earliest patterns of the fan and Greek Key which both came into use 1863-4. Talking to other collectors, one has seen an unfrosted version of this. But in all my trawls of antique centres etc, this is the first pressed frosted custard I have seen, anyone seen any more?

Offline madweasel

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Re: Pressed frosted custard cup
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2021, 10:34:25 PM »
Hi there NeilH

Just looking for more help for this fragment on the right, also from Trimdon Street, Sunderland. It has the Greek Key and the radiating fan, I think, that you describe on your example.

It comes from that layer that might have glass from a number of sources - so I wonder if you think it could be a Molineaux Webb also. Or, if you are not sure, to what extent did other companies 'play' around with elements of other designers to come up with their own patterns? Was there a concept of design plagiarism, at least in part?

John

Offline neilh

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Re: Pressed frosted custard cup
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2021, 06:07:29 PM »
This is rather good timing as I have just returned from a few days in Manchester doing density testing on my collection that was marooned there, including the custard cup, and it gave a value of 2.57g/cc which is too low for Molineaux Webb, and it's probably northeast. Doh!

Your fragment looks like a star flare on the bottom of a bowl or plate, with GK surround, difficult to tell from a small piece, I do not recognise it.

My thoughts on design plagiarism is that local copying was rife in British Glass, more than northeast / northwest copying. No hard and fast rules though!

Offline Paul S.

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Re: Pressed frosted custard cup
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2021, 04:17:19 PM »
As Neil will know in vastly more detail than me, Molineaux Webb Registered many pressed items in the 1860s - 1870s showing Greek Key and frosted open spaces and I can't imagine the piece shown here by Neil is anything other than a custard with handle  -  jellies tend to lack the handle.    Despite the prodigious quantities of such utility items having been around both before and during the pressed era, I was staggered to draw a blank when looking through the Kew archives spanning the period 1840 to late 1870s  -  people who collect such pieces know how commonly they were produced during C19 and on into the early C20.     Quite what the overriding reason was for the lack of Registered custards I've no idea.         
M. & W. Registered a variety of specific shapes and designs, many showing the G/Key, frosting and cog wheel rims, the given Registrations all appearing to protect both the shape and surface design. Is it possible, as occurred similarly with some other manufacturers, that M. & W. simply took one of their already used G/Key designs with frosting, and applied it to a custard.       As Neil says, in the absence of a diamond or No. then doubtless we shall never know the answer.

Mostly unrelated, but of interest re the C19 use of the G/Key on a Registered item - the attached picture, which we've seen here before, is possibly the earliest use of the Key pattern during the lozenge/Registered period.     The item is blown I'm sure, and never pressed, but time wise fits with the then current passion for interest in Classical art etc.   

 

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