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Author Topic: cut glass jug  (Read 146 times)

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Offline Mick the fish

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cut glass jug
« on: July 16, 2021, 06:32:34 PM »
 Hello all, could anyone tell me anything about this lovely very heavy cut glass jug I bought today. it's really nice sparkles in the sun like a diamond I just had to have it even with a slight chip on the top rim.
It is 10 inches high, 8 inches from lip to handle, the bowl is 5 inches wide and the foot is 4 inches in diameter and weighs 2.3kg.

Your learned opinions would be really appreciated.

Thanks Mick 

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: cut glass jug
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2021, 06:59:36 PM »
looks v. attractive and is typical of modern Continental cutting of star within a sort of pinwheel arrangement plus some v. deep mitres and multiple radial cuts on the underside of the foot.     The shape of the jug looks to be copying a late C18 and early C19 water jug  - possibly a take on the Anglo-Irish appearance.      I'd take a punt and suggest made within the last twenty years - possibly depending on wear - and as for origin likely to be what is called Bohemia.          The country as such disappeared at the end of WW I and much of the area became Czechoslovakia, but with it's history of quality glass production, it was obviously too good a name to bin, so the name has been retained and it's seen often on labels that are stuck to the glass.      Glass from that area seems v. common, and though most is the usual bowls and vases, this shape is more appealing.           One thing to mention is that whilst the U.K. regs. seem to stipulate that full lead crystal should contain c. 34% lead oxide, some of the Continental makers often drop that considerably.       But the point is it's attractive, you like it and that's really all that matters .....................   just don't drop it on your feet. ;)

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Offline Mick the fish

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Re: cut glass jug
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2021, 08:55:33 AM »
Hi Paul thanks for your very comprehensive and interesting reply much appreciated. I am learning a lot on this extremely helpful site. My wife and I have collected glass items that we like for many years, without really knowing what they are, how old they are, or who produced them. With the help of you learned members on here we are learning fast, thanks to you all for sharing your knowledge.

Regards Mick

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: cut glass jug
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2021, 01:34:54 PM »
hi  -  collecting pieces because you like them is probably the best way to collect, at least you shouldn't get bored with them for a very long time.     There is a lot of good information offered by the guys here, many of whom are very knowledgeable, but I would still recommend buying just a few quality books from which you will also learn much ................   for British glass, generally, spanning C19 and C20 I'd suggest both of the Hajdamach offerings  -  then, depending on your personal taste perhaps Bickerton for drinking glasses from C18 and C19, plus others that may appeal.     These can be found on Abe, for example, and purchased as pre-owned.      Sadly, there isn't anything specific on British cut glass, though you will find odd chapters or sections in some of the better books.

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