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Recent Posts

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71
British & Irish Glass / Re: Honey pot ?
« Last post by Paul S. on July 19, 2021, 12:43:16 PM »
yes, seem to recall that one did start with me  -  so you'd imagine I might have remembered, but age is responsible for so much.         It would seem the landing pad is not always present.
72
British & Irish Glass / Re: Honey pot ?
« Last post by chopin-liszt on July 19, 2021, 11:57:33 AM »
I seem to remember Christine might have got it from you, Paul. It's a stunning thing.
But the landing pad is something I seem to remember was important and might distinguish between one maker and another.
It's a bit hazy in my memory. Christine's brain might be functioning better than mine.

There is this one too, which is Vallerysthal.
http://lustrousstone.co.uk/cpg/displayimage.php?pid=1995
73
Glass / Re: Fairy light
« Last post by Paul S. on July 19, 2021, 11:45:14 AM »
thanks for the link.
74
France / Re: Sabino large bowl. Age, Date info appreciated!
« Last post by Ekimp on July 19, 2021, 11:44:32 AM »
I picked this piece up at auction and had to give a good fight...
Hi, was it a sleeper? It sounds like someone else knew what it was so you probably have a reasonable idea of value. If it was properly catalogued and on the Internet you could tell us exactly what it is worth :D
75
Glass / Re: Fairy light
« Last post by Lustrousstone on July 19, 2021, 11:41:09 AM »
It screams Bohemian to me. White lined with pink with amber trim is a very common colour combination. The pontil mark would be typical too. The rim won't be uranium, the white just might be but probably isn't. Here is Jim's web page https://www.fairylampclub.com/
76
Glass / Re: Frosted decanter.
« Last post by Ekimp on July 19, 2021, 11:41:03 AM »
Thanks for the replies. That’s interesting about the American “roughened” lamps, presumably they are roughened over a large area like the decanter and not just in detail like on the compote? When you mention the technique of grinding as a low cost substitute for engraving used on the compote, I thought of the similar crude decoration of cloud shapes or oak leaves on some 19th century decanters and glasses such as these: http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,54497.0.html

...but I'm struggling to see it as a method used to produce a frosted surface as shown on this decanter  -  for obvious reasons grinding wheels generally are coarse in texture, and if the glass has to be further processed to smooth out those coarse marks then as a process, efficiency would be lost.      Additionally, the need to maintain a perfectly smoothly curved surface - avoiding flats - would be at risk if held up to a grinding wheel.

I don’t think you would use a coarse grit grinding wheel but use the finest grit that was coarse enough to produce the desired effect in one go. In McConnell page 80 where he talks about grinding stoppers and decanter necks in 1675, he talks of various grades of powdered emery being available that was mixed in oil - so the abrasive wasn’t part of the wheel but an applied paste. I understood that cutting with copper wheels was achieved by using various grade grinding pastes as the abrasive.  If the blank was turned in a lathe as I suggest then there wouldn’t be any flats caused by holding the blank up to a grinding wheel.

I found in the Corning Museum of Glass dictionary a short description of ‘lathe cutting’ where a blank is turned in a lathe and a tool fed with abrasive is applied to the blank to ‘polish it, modify the profile, or cut it’:  https://www.cmog.org/glass-dictionary/lathe-cutting

Might needle work, etched through the resist, produce very fine directional marks?
I think this was in connection with the grinding decoration on the compote? I think the marks produced by needle etching would be very obvious. Occasionally you see imitations of Northwood’s work where instead of frosting between the needle etched outline with a grinding wheel or white acid frosting (see reply eight), they have used more needle etching. This stands out like a sore thumb and looks very crude and I don’t think something you could mistake for mechanical grinding or proper acid frosting. I can’t find an example at the moment.

The Greek key on the decanter has been cut with a wheel.
77
Could it be a Webb perfume bottle? There are many online with silver collars and tops but not one with the same decoration as yours, Webb did do a Convolvulus pattern. Yours looks slightly rough around the rim where the collar would have fitted and the size is right.
78
British & Irish Glass / Re: Honey pot ?
« Last post by Paul S. on July 19, 2021, 08:25:16 AM »
thanks, yes that's the one I had in mind  -  a uranium example.    I'd forgotten completely that it was Leerdam  -  I notice Christine hasn't given a date range for this one.
79
Glass / Re: Frosted decanter.
« Last post by Paul S. on July 19, 2021, 08:13:09 AM »
Not sure to what extent this 'grinding' - to produce basic and crude decoration - was used in the U.K. in the C19  -  it is used as we know as a preparation in the process of cutting, but I'm struggling to see it as a method used to produce a frosted surface as shown on this decanter  -  for obvious reasons grinding wheels generally are coarse in texture, and if the glass has to be further processed to smooth out those coarse marks then as a process, efficiency would be lost.      Additionally, the need to maintain a perfectly smoothly curved surface - avoiding flats - would be at risk if held up to a grinding wheel.               Prodigious amounts of drinking related wares - in the C19 in the U.K. - were decorated using a copper engraving wheel, and I'd suggest most of the 'fern' (pteridomania) cutting, seen on drinking glasses etc. were so decorated - the final appearance is similar to that shown by Cagney, but the result is much finer.      This multiple repeat 'slightly curved and arching' shape was a staple decorative motif used by the wheel engravers, presumably replicating some sort of floral motif.        Should we dismiss the possibility of the frosting on this piece having been the result of machine acid etching, especially if the area to be treated - as with this example - is geometrically easy to produce, and not some very detailed intricate image?        Might needle work, etched through the resist, produce very fine directional marks?            Acid appears to have been used commonly in the C19, with health hazards ignored, and the benefit of producing very fine results in the way of smoothness etc. would not have been an opportunity they might have ignored.       How was the Greek Key produced here - engraved or acid etched?
80
Glass / Re: Fairy light
« Last post by bat20 on July 19, 2021, 08:01:14 AM »
New torch on it’s way , I have a few pieces I want to check !thanks for your replies everyone.
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